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Sandringham Village Festival with Andy Griffiths & Lenny Hayes
2014 Man Booker Prize Winner
New releases for October
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BAYSIDE READER
October: The month of festivals and carnivals

Daylight saving has arrived and the weather is warmer, sunnier, and generally a great time for the revitalising the home, the garden, having barbeques, socialising and sitting outside and reading a book.

Locally we have the annual Sandringham Village Festival, while all of Melbourne will be celebrating during the Spring Racing Carnival.

Sandringham Village Festival 2014

The Sandirngham Village Festival is on again this year:

Sunday 26th October 2014 from 10am until 5pm.

Sandringham traders will be open on the day and there will be market stalls, food, and local community groups. There is a great programme of live music scheduled for our two stages with local performers as well as celtic folk band Saoirse, Kings of Leisure, and popular cover band Two Dogs.  For the children we have four rides this year including a jumping castle, swing chairs, giant slide and animal farm,and  a magician.

I am very excited that the store has been able to organise appearances by two celebrities for the festival.
  • 11 am:  Popular children’s author,  Andy Griffiths, on the Melrose Street stage.   Andy Griffiths
Andy will follow this up by signing his books in our marquee outside the store, kindly sponsored by the Bayside Library Service, Words by the Bay Literary Series programme.  Please note that while this is a free event, numbers may have to be capped on the day. Andy will sign one book per child and we will have copies of the Treehouse series, the Just series and his other books available to purchase on the day.Lenny: My Story
 
  • 2pm:  St Kilda Football star Lenny Hayes will be outside the store.  If you purchase a copy of his new memior, Lenny: My Story he will sign it along with a piece of memorabilia.  This would make a great Christmas gift for the St Kilda fan in your family.  If you aren't able to make it on the day, we can arrange a signed copy for you.
 
                             

Just announced this morning, the winner of this year's Man Booker Prize is Australian author Richard Flanagan's The Narrow Road to the Deep North.  We're expecting stock of the new smaller edition in the next few days.  Follow this link for the judges comments.
AUTHOR EVENTS
These events can be booked online by clicking the book cover, or directly at Ulysses Bookstore by ringing 9521 8020 or dropping in. 

GRAEME SIMSION & THE ROSIE EFFECT
Sunday 16 November, 2:30 pm


We still have some tickets left for this event so don't leave it too late to book.  It will be held at:
Sandringham Club Function Room
92 Beach Road, Sandringham, (Entry from Bamfield Street)
Doors open at 2:15 pm
Tickets: $10.00.  Ticket and copy of book:  $35.00

(The book can be collected prior to the event so you don't have to wait for the event to read the next installment)
 
Man Booker Prize 2014 Short List
Winner:  The Narrow Road to the Deep North, Richard Flanagan $32.99
The Lives of Others, Neel Mukherjee $32.99
How to Be Both, Ali Smith, $29.99
J, Howard Jacobson, $32.99
We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves, Karen Joy Fowler, $22.99
To Rise Again At A Decent Hour, Joshua Ferris, $22.99
BOOKS FOR BOOK CLUBS
When the Night Comes, Favel Parrett, $27.99

Ulysses Bookstore's October Book Club book.
BEST SELLING FICTION FOR SEPTEMBER
1.   When the Night Comes, Favel Parrett
2.   Personal,  Lee Child
3.   Big Little Lies, Liane Moriarty
4.   The Bone Clocks, David Mitchell
5.   Gone Girl (Film Tie In Edition), Gillian Flynn
BEST SELLING NON FICTION FOR SEPTEMBER
1.   This House of Grief, Helen Garner
2.  Triumph and Demise, Paul Kelly
3.   Jamie's Comfort Food, Jamie Oliver
4.   James Halliday Australian Wine Companion, James Halliday
5.  Strictly Parenting, Michael Carr-Gregg
New Releases for October
Fiction
The Rosie EffectThe Rosie Effect, Graeme Simsion, $29.99

In this sequel to The Rosie Project, Don and Rosie face a new challenge – parenting.   In true Tillman style, Don instantly becomes an expert on all things obstetric. But in between immersing himself in a new research study on parenting and implementing the Standardised Meal System (pregnancy version), Don’s old weaknesses resurface. And while he strives to get the technicalities right, he gets the emotions all wrong, and risks losing Rosie when she needs him most.

A good read for a lazy Sunday afternoon, The Rosie Effect has the humour and lovable characters that we met in The Rosie Effect.
Hello from the GillespiesHello from the Gillespies, Monica McInerney, $29.99

For more than thirty years, Angela Gillespie has sent friends and family around the world an end-of-year letter titled 'Hello from the Gillespies'. It's always been cheery and full of good news. This year, Angela surprises herself – she tells the truth,  The Gillespies are far from the perfect family that Angela has made them out to be. Her husband seems to be having a mid-life crisis.  Her grown-up twins are having career meltdowns.  Her third daughter, badly in debt, can't stop crying.  And her ten-year-old son spends more time talking to his imaginary friend than to real ones.

Without Angela, the family would fall apart. But when Angela is taken from them in a most unexpected manner, the Gillespies pull together – and pull themselves together – in wonderfully surprising ways.
AmnesiaAmnesia, Peter Carey, $32.99

When Gaby Baillieux releases the Angel Worm into the computers of Australia's prison system, hundreds of asylum seekers walk free. Worse: an American corporation runs prison security, so the malware infects some 5000 American places of incarceration. Doors spring open. Both countries' secrets threaten to pour out.

Was this American intrusion a mistake, or had Gaby declared cyberwar on the US? Felix Moore – known to himself as 'Australia's last serving left-wing journalist' – has no doubt. Her act was part of the covert conflict between Australia and America. Funded by his property-developer mate Woody Townes, Felix is going to write Gaby's biography, to save her, and himself, and maybe his country.  But how to get Gaby to co-operate? What role does her film-star mother have to play? And what, after all, does Woody really want?
Nora WebsterNora Webster, Colm Toibin, $29.99

It is the late 1960s in Ireland. Nora Webster is living in a small town, looking after her four children, trying to rebuild her life after the death of her husband. She is fiercely intelligent, at times difficult and impatient, at times kind, but she is trapped by her circumstances, and waiting for any chance which will lift her beyond them. Slowly, through the gift of music and the power of friendship, she finds a glimmer of hope and a way of starting again.As the dynamic of the family changes, she seems both fiercely self-possessed but also a figure of great moral ambiguity, making her one of the most memorable heroines in contemporary fiction. The portrait that is painted in the years that follow is harrowing, piercingly insightful, always tender and deeply true.
Some LuckSome Luck, Jane Smiley, $29.99

Life can change in an instant, and as those changes amass over the course of one hundred years, something extraordinary happens - history is made. In this masterful novel, Jane Smiley explores the triumphs and tragedies of one family, while casting a panoramic eye on the first half of the twentieth century, a time of monumental change.

Some Luck opens on the humble, heavily indebted Langdon family farm in 1920. We meet Rosanna and Walter, their curious, brilliant newborn Frank. Soon the family grows to five children, all wildly different yet remarkable, with such potential to mark history in their own ways. Yet as time passes, as it must, some thrive as others fall victim to flaws and fate. Who will persevere? Who will simply, sadly, be forgotten?
UsUs, David Mitchell, $29.99

By the author of the bestselling book One Day comes Us which tells the story of Douglas Petersen, whose marriage of twenty-one years to Connie is almost over. When Autumn comes around, their son Albie will leave for university. Connie has decided to leave soon after. But there's still the summer holidays to get through - a Grand Tour of Europe's major cities - and over the course of the journey, Douglas devises a plan to win back the love of his wife and repair his troubled relationship with his son. Forced to understand why his marriage is in tatters, he looks back to the beginning of their relationship and learns once again whom he fell in love with.

Us is the history of a family, recounted over the course of what may well be their final weeks together. It's a comedy about the demands of living together, about parenthood, about the relationship between reason and emotion, art and science, parents and children, middle-age and youth.

Longlisted for this years Man Booker Prize.
Leaving TimeLeaving Time, Jodi Picoult, $32.99

Alice Metcalf was a devoted mother, loving wife and accomplished scientist who studied grief among elephants. Yet it's been a decade since she disappeared under mysterious circumstances, leaving behind her small daughter, husband, and the animals to which she devoted her life. All signs point to abandonment - or worse.

Still Jenna - now thirteen years old and truly orphaned by a father maddened by grief - steadfastly refuses to believe in her mother's desertion. So she decides to approach the two people who might still be able to help her find Alice: a disgraced psychic named Serenity Jones, and Virgil Stanhope, the cynical detective who first investigated her mother's disappearance and the strange, possibly linked death of one of her mother's coworkers.  Together these three lonely souls will discover truths destined to forever change their lives.
To Name Those LostTo Name Those Lost, Rohan Wilson, $29.99

Summer 1874, and Launceston teeters on the brink of anarchy. After abandoning his wife and child many years ago, the Black War veteran Thomas Toosey must return to the city to search for William, his now motherless twelve-year-old son. He travels through the island's northern districts during a time of impossible hardship - hardship that has left its mark on him too. Arriving in Launceston, however, Toosey discovers a town in chaos. He is desperate to find his son amid the looting and destruction, but at every turn he is confronted by the Irish transportee Fitheal Flynn and his companion, the hooded man, to whom Toosey owes a debt that he must repay.

Rohan's debut novel, The Roving Party won the Vogel Literary Award for an unpublished manuscript in 2011.

 
The Love Song of Miss Queenie HennessyThe Love Song of Miss Queenie Hennessy, Rachel Joyce, $32.99

When Queenie Hennessy discovers that Harold Fry is walking the length of England to save her, and all she has to do is wait, she is shocked. Her note to him had explained she was dying from cancer. How can she wait?  A new volunteer at the hospice suggests that Queenie should write a second letter; only this time she must tell Harold the truth. Composing this letter, the volunteer promises, will ensure Queenie hangs on. It will also atone for the secrets of the past. As the volunteer points out, ‘It isn't Harold who is saving you. It is you, saving Harold Fry.'  This is that letter. A letter that was never sent.

So many of my customers have loved the delightful The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry so it's great to have a companion to this sweet tale.
Crime
Crucifixion Creek:The Belltree Trilogy, Book One, Barry Maitland, $29.99

Homicide detective Harry Belltree wouldn't usually be looking too hard at an elderly couple's suicide pact. Especially now, when his brother-in-law Greg has just been stabbed to death. But it seems Greg and the old couple had ties to the same man, a bent moneylender with friends in high places—and low.

Harry can't get officially involved in Greg's murder, but he suspects a link with two other mysterious deaths: his parents'. And when he goes off-grid to investigate, that's when things start to get dangerous.

 
The Handsome Man's De Luxe CafeThe Handsome Man's De Lux Cafe, Alexander McCall Smith, $34.99

Welcome to the latest adventure in the popular The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency series.

Even the arrival of her baby can't hold Mma Makutsi back from success in the workplace, and so no sooner than she becomes a full partner in the No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency (in spite of Mma Ramotswe's belated claims that she is only 'an assistant full partner'), she also launches a new enterprise of her own, the Handsome Man's De Luxe Caf . Grace Makutsi is a lady with a business plan, but who could predict temperamental chefs, drunken waiters and more? Luckily, help is at hand, from the only person in Gaborone more gently determined than Mma Makutsi . . . Mma Ramotswe, of course.
Sociology & Current Affairs
Walking FreeWalking Free, Dr Munjed Al Muderis, $32.99

In 1999, Munjed Al Muderis was a young surgical resident working in Baghdad when a squad of Military Police marched into the operating theatre and ordered the surgical team to mutilate the ears of three busloads of army deserters. When the head of surgery refused, he was executed in front of his staff. Munjed's choices were stark--comply and breach the medical oath 'do no harm', refuse and face certain death, or flee.

That day, Munjed's life changed forever. He escaped to Indonesia, where he boarded a filthy, overcrowded refugee boat, bound for Australia.  Like his fellow passengers, he hoped for a new life, free from fear and oppression, but for ten months he was incarcerated in what became known as the worst of the refugee camps, Curtin Detention Centre in Western Australia. There he was known only by a number, locked in solitary confinement and repeatedly told to go back to Iraq.

On 26 August 2000, Munjed was finally freed. Now, fourteen years later, he is one of the world's leading osseointegration surgeons, transforming the lives of amputees with a pioneering technique that allows them to walk again.
The Wife DroughtThe Wife Drought, Annabel Crabb, $34.99

'I need a wife'.  It's a common joke among women juggling work and family. But it's not actually a joke. Having a spouse who takes care of things at home is a Godsend on the domestic front. It's a potent economic asset on the work front. And it's an advantage enjoyed – even in our modern society – by vastly more men than women.

Working women are in an advanced, sustained, and chronically under-reported state of wife drought, and there is no sign of rain.    But why is the work-and-family debate always about women? Why don't men get the same flexibility that women do? In our fixation on the barriers that face women on the way into the workplace, do we forget about the barriers that – for men – still block the exits?

Written in Annabel Crabb's inimitable style, The Wife Drought is full of candid and funny stories from the author's work in and around politics and the media, historical nuggets about the role of ‘The Wife' in Australia, and intriguing research about the attitudes that pulse beneath the surface of egalitarian Australia.

 
The Art of BelongingThe Art of Belonging, Hugh Mackay, $32.99

The Art of Belonging advances the argument put forward in Mackay's bestselling The Good Life: a 'good life' is not lived in isolation or in the pursuit of independent goals; a good life is lived at the heart of a thriving community, among people we trust, and within an environment of mutual respect.

Drawing on 50 years' experience as a social researcher, Mackay creates a fictional suburb, Southwood, and populates it with characters who - like most of us - struggle to reconcile their need to belong with their desire to live life on their own terms. He chronicles the numerous human interactions and inevitable conflicts that arise in a community when characters assert their own needs at the expense of others.Through a series of riveting, interconnected stories, Mackay reveals the beautiful symmetry of the human condition: we need communities, but communities also need us. His book is a quiet but persuasive entreaty to readers to take responsibility for the places where they live by engaging, volunteering, joining up and joining in.
Company of CowardsIn the Company of Cowards, Michael Mori, $29.99

On a beautiful, balmy evening in Cuba in 2007, David Hicks walked out of Guantanamo Bay, in that moment ceasing to be a detainee of the United States and regaining his rights as an Australian citizen. Watching on was the man who had fought for four long years for Hicks's right to go home: Major Michael Mori.

Having grown up as an all-American boy, Mori joined the US Marine Corps as an eighteen-year-old, determined to give his life order and to serve the country he held dear. After training and serving as a military lawyer, he accepted a position as a defence counsel for the military commissions set up in the wake of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. And then David Hicks's case file landed on his desk.

A firm believer in the importance of due process, Mori grew increasingly alarmed by how the military and the US and Australian governments were handling the Hicks case, and others like it. Why was a distinction being made between 'unlawful combatants' and 'prisoners of war'? Why was the Australian government refusing to intervene for one of its people? And what specific crime – if any – had Hicks allegedly committed that deserved years of incarceration without trial?

What followed was a long struggle for justice, and one man's gradual disillusionment with the institution that he had signed up to fight for. Michael Mori rallied the support of the Australian people as he exposed an unfair system, changing the way we saw our government and the War on Terror.
A Fig At The GateA Fig at the Gate, Kate Llewellyn, $27.99

In A Fig at the Gate, author Kate Llewellyn, now in her seventies, embraces a new phase in her life, asking the question, 'How does one live well?'

Following the joyful crafting of her gardens in the Blue Mountains (The Waterlily) and north of Wollongong (Playing with Water), Kate creates a new garden near the sea in Adelaide, planting olives, plums, limes and blood oranges, learning how to keep poultry, setting a duck on eggs. Delight and enrichment come with the learning of new skills, being close to family and old friends, long companionable beach walks, rediscovering old recipes, food and wine.

Wise and joyful, accepting what she cannot change while relishing what she has, Kate shares the beauties and frailties of the human condition and shows us what the gifts of ageing can bring.
Science & History
Forensics: The Anatomy of Crime, Val McDermid $32.99

The dead talk. To the right listener, they tell us all about themselves: where they came from, how they lived, how they died - and who killed them. Forensic scientists can unlock the mysteries of the past and help justice to be done using the messages left by a corpse, a crime scene or the faintest of human traces.

Forensics draws on interviews with top-level professionals, ground-breaking research and Val McDermid's own experience to lay bare the secrets of this fascinating science. And, along the way, she wonders at how maggots collected from a corpse can help determine time of death, how a DNA trace a millionth the size of a grain of salt can be used to convict a killer and how a team of young Argentine scientists led by a maverick American anthropologist uncovered the victims of a genocide.
VictoriaVictoria: A Life, A.N. Wilson, $49.99

When Queen Victoria died in 1901, she had ruled for nearly sixty-four years. She was mother of nine and grandmother of forty-two, and the matriarch of Royal Europe, through the marriages of her children. To many, Queen Victoria is a ruler shrouded in myth and mystique - an ageing, stiff widow, paraded as the figurehead to an all-male imperial enterprise. But in truth, Britain's longest reigning monarch was one of the most passionate, expressive, humorous and unconventional women who ever lived, and the story of her life continues to fascinate.

A. N. Wilson's exhaustively researched and definitive biography includes a wealth of new material from previously unseen sources, to show us Queen Victoria as she's never been seen before. It explores the curious set of circumstances that led to Victoria's coronation, her strange and isolated childhood, her passionate marriage, Prince Albert's pivotal influence, her widowhood and subsequent intimate friendship with John Brown, set against the backdrop of this momentous epoch in Britain - and Europe's - history.
Civil War: The History of England Volume 3Civil War: The History of England Volume 3, Peter Ackroyd $34.99

In Civil War, Peter Ackroyd continues his dazzling account of England's history, beginning with the progress south of the Scottish king, James VI, who on the death of Elizabeth I became the first Stuart king of England, and ends with the deposition and flight into exile of his grandson, James II. The Stuart dynasty brought together the two nations of England and Scotland into one realm, albeit a realm still marked by political divisions that echo to this day. More importantly, perhaps, the Stuart era was marked by the cruel depredations of civil war, and the killing of a king. Ackroyd paints a vivid portrait of James I and his heirs.

Shrewd and opinionated, the new King was eloquent on matters as diverse as theology, witchcraft and the abuses of tobacco, but his attitude to the English parliament sowed the seeds of the division that would split the country in the reign of his hapless heir, Charles I. Ackroyd offers a brilliant - warts and all - portrayal of Charles's nemesis Oliver Cromwell, Parliament's great military leader and England's only dictator, who began his career as a political liberator but ended it as much of a despot as 'that man of blood', the king he executed.

 
First FleetFirst Fleet, Rob Mundle, $45.00

First Fleet tells the extraordinary story of the eighteenth century convoy of eleven ships that left England on 13 May 1787 for the 'lands beyond the seas'. Aboard were seafarers, convicts, marines, and a few good citizens - some 1300 in all - who had been consigned to a virtually unknown land on the opposite side of the world where they would establish a penal colony, and a nation.

The fleet stopped at Tenerife, Rio de Janeiro and Cape Town before sailing across the notorious and challenging Southern Ocean, bound for Botany Bay. Somehow, all 11 ships arrived safely between 18 and 20 January, 1788. But, it's what happened during 252 days at sea while sailing half way around the world, and subsequently on land, that is almost beyond belief. No nation has ever been founded in such a courageous and dangerous manner. It's the basis for one hell of an adventure.
MonashMonash, Roland Perry, $34.99

Australian General Sir John Monash changed the way wars were fought and won. When the British and German High Commands of the First World War failed to gain ascendancy after four years of unprecedented human slaughter, Monash used innovative techniques and modern technology to plan and win a succession of major battles that led to the end of the Great War.  But Australia's greatest military commander fought as many battles with those on his side as he did with his enemies. Monash was the classic outsider who rose to greatness despite the mighty odd of his 'handicaps of birth' -- having a German-Jewish background at a time when racism and prejudice were rife: and being a part-time colonial soldier in an Imperial British army.

Drawing on the subject's comprehensive letter and diary archive Roland Perry has produced a riveting portrait that weaves together the many strands of Monash's life as a family man, student, engineer, businessman, lawyer, teacher, soldier, leader, romantic and lover of the arts; and reveals why, in addition to his amazing military successes, Monash is remembered and respected even more for his humanity.
Charles BeanCharles Bean: War Correspondent, Ross Coulthart, $45.00

On the eve of the centenary of Gallipoli Ross Coulthart tells the real story of the iconic Australian war correspondent. CEW Bean's wartime reports and photographs mythologised the Australian soldier and helped spawn the notion that the Anzacs achieved something nation-defining on the shores of Gallipoli and the battlefields of western Europe. In his quest to get the truth, Bean often faced death beside the Diggers in the trenches of Gallipoli and the Western Front - and saw more combat than many. But did Bean tell Australia the whole story of what he knew? In this fresh new biography Ross Coulthart explores the man behind the legend.
Business & Politics
The Menzies EraThe Menzies Era, John Howard, $59.99

The monumental Sir Robert Menzies held power for a total of over 18 years, making him the longest-serving Australian Prime Minister. During his second term as Prime Minister, a term of over sixteen years - by far the longest unbroken tenure in that office - Menzies dominated Australian politics like no one else has ever done before or since, and these years laid the foundations for modern Australia.

Through the Menzies era, there was huge economic growth, social change and considerable political turmoil. Covering the impact of the great Labor split of 1955 as well as the recovery of the Labor Party under Whitlam's leadership in the late 1960s and the impact of the Vietnam War on Australian politics, this book offers a comprehensive assessment of the importance of the Menzies era in Australian life, history and politics. John Howard, only ten when Menzies rose to power, and in young adulthood when the Menzies era came to an end, saw Menzies as an inspiration and a role model. His unique insights and thoughtful analysis into Menzies the man, the politician, and his legacy make this a fascinating, highly significant book.
My Story: Julia GillardMy Story, Julia Gillard, $49.99

On Wednesday 23 June 2010, with the government in turmoil, Julia Gillard asked Prime Minister Kevin Rudd for a leadership ballot.  The next day, Julia Gillard became Australia's 27th prime minister, and our first female leader. Australia was alive to the historic possibilities. Here was a new approach for a new time.  It was to last three extraordinary years.

This is Julia Gillard's chronicle of that turbulent time, a strikingly candid self-portrait of a political leader seeking to realise her ideals. It is her story of what it was like - in the face of government in-fighting and often hostile media - to manage a hung parliament, build a diverse and robust economy, create an equitable and world-class education system, ensure a dignified future for Australians with disabilities, all while attending to our international obligations and building strategic alliances for our future. This is a politician driven by a sense of purpose - from campus days with the Australian Union of Students, to a career in the law, to her often gritty, occasionally glittering rise up the ranks of the Australian Labor Party.

 
How Google WorksHow Google Works, Eric Schmidt & Jonath Rosenberg, $32.99

Both Eric Schmidt and Jonathan Rosenberg came to Google as seasoned Silicon Valley business executives, but over the course of a decade they came to see the wisdom in Coach John Wooden's observation that 'it's what you learn after you know it all that counts'. As they helped grow Google from a young start-up to a global icon, they relearned everything they knew about management.

How Google Works is the sum of those experiences and provides valuable insight into corporate culture, strategy, talent, decision-making, communication, innovation, and dealing with disruption. The authors explain how the confluence of three seismic changes - the internet, mobile, and cloud computing - has shifted the balance of power from companies to consumers. The companies that will thrive in this ever-changing landscape will be the ones that create superior products and attract a new breed of multifaceted employees whom the authors dub 'smart creatives'.
The Arts, Entertainment & Fashion
A Bone of FactA Bone of Fact, Don Watson, $55.00

David Walsh - the creator of Mona in Hobart - is both a giant and an enigma in the Australian art world. A multi-millionaire who made his money gambling, David has turned a wild vision into a unique reality; he is in turns controversial, mysterious and idolised.  A Bone of Fact is his utterly unconventional and absorbing memoir.  This is a beautiful hardback book with gold edging and photos throughout.
Places To GoKate Spade: Places to Go, People to See, Kate Spade, $49.99

This book focuses on the how, where and why of travel through the lens of the always-inspired Kate Spade. This beautiful book features vibrant photography, old-world glamour, a dash of charm and inspirational quotes, tips and words of wisdom that every kate spade new york girl should know. Kate Spade New York: Places to Go, People to See showcases chic destinations such as Paris, New York City, the Amalfi Coast, Marrakech, Tokyo, and St Moritz, along with ways to incorporate those things seen, heard and experienced into life back home.
The Forever HouseThe Forever House, Cameron Bruhn, $70.00

Imagine a home designed and built especially for your family to grow, evolve and create memories in over a lifetime.

The Forever House celebrates 23 such dwellings through the intimate stories of the families and architects who created them.  Featuring the Seidler house in Sydney and an introduction from Peggy Seidler for the 60′s section, the Forever House covers the 50′s, 60′s, 70′s and 80′s with an essay introducing each section.  These are homes, still lived in today by the families that had them commissioned.
More Fool Me, Stephen Fry, $45.00

In this early thirties, Stephen Fry – writer, comedian, star of stage and screen – had, as they say, 'made it'.  What could possibly go wrong? 

Well, as the 80s drew to a close, he discovered a most enjoyable way to burn the candle at both ends, and took to excess like a duck to breadcrumbs.  Writing and recording by day, haunting a never-ending series of celebrity parties, drinking dens and poker games by night, in a ludicrous and impressive act of bravado, he fooled all those except the very closest to him, some of whom were most enjoyably engaged in the same dance. He was, to all intents and purposes, a high-functioning addict.  Blazing brightly and partying wildly as the 80s turned to the 90s – AIDS became an epidemic and politics turned really nasty – he was so busy, so distracted by the high life, that he could hardly see the inevitable, headlong tumble that must surely follow.
Not That Kind of GirlNot That Kind of Girl, Lena Dunham, $29.99
From the acclaimed creator, producer and star of HBO's Girls comes a hilarious, wise and fiercely candid collection of personal essays that establishes Lena Dunham as one of the most original young talents writing today. In Not That Kind of Girl, Dunham illuminates the experiences that are part of making one's way in the world: falling in love, feeling alone, being ten pounds overweight despite eating only health food, having to prove yourself to a room full of men twice your age, finding true love, and most of all, having the guts to believe that your story is one that deserves to be told. Exuberant, moving and keenly observed, Not That Kind of Girl is a series of despatches from the frontlines of the struggle that is growing up.
So, AnywaySo, Anyway, John Cleese, $35.00

Candid and brilliantly funny, this is the story of how a tall, shy youth from Weston-super-Mare went on to become a self-confessed legend. En route, John Cleese describes his nerve-racking first public appearance, at St Peter's Preparatory School at the age of eight and five-sixths; his endlessly peripatetic home life with parents who seemed incapable of staying in any house for longer than six months; his first experiences in the world of work as a teacher who knew nothing about the subjects he was expected to teach; his hamster-owning days at Cambridge; and his first encounter with the man who would be his writing partner for over two decades, Graham Chapman. And so on to his dizzying ascent via scriptwriting for Peter Sellers, David Frost, Marty Feldman and others to the heights of Monty Python.

Punctuated from time to time with John Cleese's thoughts on topics as diverse as the nature of comedy, the relative merits of cricket and waterskiing, and the importance of knowing the dates of all the kings and queens of England, this is a masterly performance by a former schoolmaster.
My Bon ScottMy Bon Scott, Irene Thornton, $34.99

In 1971 Adelaide girl Irene Thornton meets Bon Scott, the singer for local band Fraternity. He is a larrikin showman with a smile that rules the world. Between Bon and Irene, there is a unique spark; they marry in 1972. For the next few years, with Irene by his side, Bon Scott continues a driven but difficult journey towards AC/DC and rock 'n' roll fame.

Irene gives us the scene without the airbrushing: the bitter winters in London with Fraternity, the drinking and drugs, the group living and frayed tempers, and the broken dreams and inner demons. But she also shares details of her incredible bond with this extraordinary man, watching Bon create and perform the music that put him and AC/DC on the world stage.

This is a moving account of an artist at the height of his powers, and an intimate view of the lows that ended tragically in Bon's early death. It is a tale of loss, but also a reminder of Bon Scott's dazzling talent, unmatched energy and fearless determination to live his dreams - rare gifts he gave the world of rock.
 
Play OnPlay On: Now, Then and Fleetwood Mac, Mick Fleetwood, $32.99

Mick Fleetwood has been part of one of the world's most successful and adored bands for over four decades. Here he tells the full and candid story of that life, and what it is to be part of the ever evolving Fleetwood Mac. His all-access autobiography spans the career of one of classic rock's greatest drummers and band leaders, the co-founder of the deeply loved super group that bears his name. In this intimate portrait of a life lived in music, Fleetwood vividly recalls his upbringing in Cornwall, Egypt and Norway tapping along to whatever song was playing on the radio; his experiences as a musician in Sixties London; the early days of the band featuring Peter Green, and his close friendship with George Harrison and seemingly all of music royalty.

Play On sheds new light on Fleetwood Mac's raucous history describing the highs and lows of being part of a band that he often single-handedly kept together. His love affair with Stevie Nicks, the creation of landmark albums like Rumours and Tusk, and the many incredible and outrageous moments of recording, touring, fighting, and loving with Fleetwood Mac: all are here. He describes his life's moments with the honesty and immediacy that his fans expect, taking us to the very heart of this multi layered life. It's been a tumultuous journey with the excesses of the band's huge success at times threatening to destroy what they strived so hard to create. But through it all it's been the drive to play on that has won out. Now, then, and always, it's Fleetwood Mac.
Madamoiselle Coco Chanel and the Pulse of HistoryMademoiselle: Coco Chanel and the Pulse of History, Rhonda Garelick, $39.99

Little black dresses. Faux pearls. Jersey knits. Skirt suits. Trousers. For over a century and counting, we all continue to see some version of Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel in nearly every woman we pass on the street. But few among us realise that Chanel's role in the events of the twentieth century was as pervasive as her influence on fashion, or how deeply she absorbed and then brilliantly reimagined the historical currents around her.  Here, with unprecedented detail and scope, Rhonda Garelick shows us the Chanel who conquered the world - a woman who thirsted to create others in her image, who creatively borrowed from her famous (and infamous) intimates, who understood the idea of branding and image well ahead of her time, who created, as Garelick puts it: "wearable personality."
The DressThe Dress, Megan Hess, $29.99

From Ms Hepburn's elegant black shift to Lady Gaga's meat gown, The Dress relives the marvellous and unforgettable dresses of fashion: think Liz Hurley's safety-pin ensemble, Princess Di's neverending wedding dress, or that unforgettable white halter sported by Marilyn in The Seven Year Itch. Megan Hess' fabulous illustrations celebrate a collection of frocks that take readers on a decadent romp through fashion history, from the haute to the hot. Hess has spent her career exploring and illustrating fashion, and though it is an ever-evolving, ever-inspiring beast, there are particular instances that shine on through the years. This is a compendium of gowns that have captured a moment in history, the spirit of a generation and the indefinable energy of a fashion icon, and an exploration of why they continue to resonate with audiences, decades on. Accompanied by historical anecdotes and revealing facts, The Dress is an elegant and immersive introduction to the moments that shaped fashion, and, in turn, our lives.
Sport & Adventure
Lenny: My StoryLenny: My Story, Lenny Hayes, $39.99

Known by footballers and fans alike as the Gentleman of Football, Lenny Hayes' career in AFL has been a rollercoaster of successes and hardships. Since joining St Kilda as a rookie, he has soldiered through a lengthy knee reconstruction which saw his career be put on hold for a year, only to discover at the end of 2012 that he had a hole in his heart, requiring him to undergo open heart surgery. He returned to the game in 2013. Hayes captained the 2004 St Kilda team and co'captained in 2007; playing alongside the likes of Nick Riewoldt, Robert Harvey, Nick Dal Santo and Aaron Hamill. Lenny has been selected as an All-Australian, has won the Trevor Barker medal (Best & Fairest) three times and the Norm Smith in 2010, in conjunction to being awarded life membership of the AFL.

Lenny takes us behind the scenes and into the locker rooms at St Kilda Football Club, a club that has seen it's fair share of dramas and sensations, and what emerges is a moving story of a truly great professional and his long, outstanding career.
Adam GilchristAdam Gilchrist, Adam Gilchrist, $59.99

Going in first or seventh, wearing whites or colours, Adam Gilchrist was the most exhilarating cricketer of the modern age.

Featuring personal photographs, stories and precious keepsakes from Gilchrist’s private life and illustrious career, this book provides unprecedented access to Gilly, on and off the field. Peppered with anecdotes, reflections and jibes from friends, family and many of the biggest names in Australian and world cricket, this is the ultimate collection for sporting enthusiasts.

 
Food & Travel
Movida SoleraMovida Solera, Frank Camorra, $59.95

Journey with Frank Camorra as he searches for the traditional recipes of Andalusia in the south of Spain – a land of ancient cities, whitewashed villages, and plains planted with olive groves and vineyards.  The largest and southernmost of Spain's regions, this is a place where cultures and cuisines have always collided and mingled.

Frank meets the food and wine producers, farmers, fishermen, chefs and cooks who share the recipes they have cooked in their kitchens for generations.  Along the way, he takes in riotous spring festivals, lively markets and peaceful sherry bodegas, and reveals his favourite places to eat, drink and stay.  From an olive picker's breakfast to cuttlefish in saffron sauce and the smoky lamb skewers called pinchitos morunos, MoVida Solera is a celebration of Andalusian food and culture.
Alex's Big PotAdam's Big Pot, Adam Liaw, $39.95

In this beautifully photographed cookbook, Adam takes a practical and creative approach to family cooking, creating new flavours from ingredients you already know, all in just one big wok, pan, dish or pot. From fresh Vietnamese salads and simple South African curries, to Korean grilled pork belly and one-pot Japanese classics, the dishes in Adam's Big Pot are basic enough for the novice home cook, affordable enough to feed the whole family, and can all be made from basic supermarket ingredients. Whether you're after easy classics like shaking beef, mee goreng and lamb vindaloo or looking to add new dishes to your repertoire like tiger-skin chicken, snapper rice and Japanese souffle cheesecake, Adam's Big Pot is your guide to simple, creative family cooking.
Walking HomeWalking Home: A Pilgrimage from Humbled to Healed on the Camino de Santiago, Sonia Choquette, $19.95

Life was falling apart. Within the space of three years, New York times best-selling author and six-sensory spiritual teacher Sonia Choquette had suffered the unexpected death of two close family members, seen her marriage implode, and been let down by trusted colleagues. And sympathy was not forthcoming. 'You're a world-renowned intuitive guide and teacher,' people jeered. 'How could you not have seen this coming?' Having intuitive abilities didn't make Sonia superhuman, however. Nor did it exempt her from being wounded or suffering the pain of loss and the consequences of our all-too-human traits such as anger, resentment, and pride—traits that can lead even the best of us to stray from our path.

In order to regain her spiritual footing, Sonia turned to the age-old practice of pilgrimage and set out to walk the legendary Camino de Santiago, an 820-kilometre (500-mile) trek over the Pyrenees and across northern Spain. Day after day she pushed through hunger, exhaustion and pain to reach her destination. Eventually, mortification of the flesh gave way to spiritual renewal, and she rediscovered the gifts of humility and forgiveness that she needed to repair her world.
Happy  Reading

Tracey
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