Copy
Fall 2016 MPCD Newsletter                                                        View this email in your Web Browser

Fall 2016 News

Spring Tree & Perennial Sale, Fall Seeding, Nutrition Mistakes, Hay Testing, Watershed Community Conversations, GCWC Fuels Reduction Cost-Share Program, Tire Tanks For Sale, Forest Management for Colorado Ranchers, USDA EQIP Signup, Proper Grazing Management, Citizen's Qualitative Habitat Evaluation Index, New Endangered Species Listing Rules, Open Lands Ballot Issue 1A

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Be sure to click 'Display Images Below'  at the top of your email browser to get the full effect of our newsletter! 

You will be directed to our advertisers' websites if you click the business cards scattered throughout this newsletter.


If you see a 'Read More..."  or "This Message has been Clipped" link at the bottom of this newsletter, click it to reveal hidden material.

Contact the Middle Park Conservation District at anytime by calling the office at 970.724.3456 or Katlin's cell at 970.531.0127.

 

    Spring Tree Seedling & Perennial Sale
Has Begun!


The Middle Park Conservation District is once again serving as the local cooperator for the CSFS Nursery Tree Seedling and Perennial Sale.

Seedlings and perennials are grown at the Colorado State Forest Service Nursery in Fort Collins and can be purchased in bulk for really low prices.   Seedlings come in packages of 1, 25, 30, or 50 trees and range in size from 5 inches to 14 inches tall. 

Tree seedlings and perennials can be utilized for a variety of conservation projects.  They can help stabilize soil on barren ground or steep slopes; reestablish logged forests; or grow up to be living windbreaks for livestock or households. 

Tree seedlings and perennials will be available for purchase through the Middle Park Conservation District until May 1st; however, some species sell out quickly.  Thus, it is best to

ORDER SOONER RATHER THAN LATER. 
 
Trees will be delivered to Frisco and Granby during
the week of May 23rd (specific dateTBD).

 
Please contact Katlin Miller with Middle Park Conservation District at
970.531.0127 or middleparkcd@gmail.com with questions or concerns.


Tree & Perennial Order Form

Get Ready to Seed!!!

Fall is a great time to seed.

Ideally, seed should be sown right before the permanent snow pack is on the ground.  You may also seed once the weather is consistently cold enough to prevent germination (consistent soil temperatures below 50 degrees Fahrenheit).  It is very important that seed not germinate in the fall because it will freeze and die.


All you have to do to seed is rough up the soil with a rake or similar tool, scatter seed and cover with approximately 1/4 inch of soil, then cover with a layer of light mulch (such as straw).

 
 The Middle Park Conservation District has several seed mixes available for purchase.
  • The Forest Mix is good for areas where beetle kill trees have been removed.
  • The Dryland Pasture Mix is good for soil erosion prevention and is also good forage for livestock and horses.  
  • Our Short Mix is ideal for disturbed areas around buildings. 
  • Our Wildflower Mix has both perennials and annuals in it and is good for adding a pop of color to your yard.  
  • We also have a turf-type lawn mix called DuraTurf and an Irrigated Meadow Mix.
Encouraging grasses and wildflowers to grow in disturbed areas will help prevent soil erosion and noxious weed invasion. 

Also be sure to check out our handy
Keys to Successful Seeding Guide
to make the most of your  seeding.

Grass Seed Composition Chart
Wildflower Composition Chart

 

2016 Seed Prices

Biggest Nutrition Mistakes

The Middle Park Conservation District recently co-sponsored two nutritional workshops with Dr. Lindy Brackett at Devil's Thumb Ranch near Tabernash.  Dr. Kelcey Swyers, a nutritional consultant from Fort Collins, spoke to 22 beef producers and 18 horse owners from around Middle Park about the Dos and Don'ts of Beef Cattle and Horse Nutrition. Over the course of the next several newsletters, I will divulge the knowledge I gained from attending these workshops, starting with today's article on the
 
Most Common Mistakes in Animal Nutrition
  1. Overgrazing
  2. Spending money on the wrong mineral program
  3. Spending money on the wrong winter protein supplement
  4. Buying whatever your favorites sales rep tells you to buy
  5. Not taking advantage of the value of least-cost balanced diets to achieve your goals
  6. Letting your hay get moldy
  7. Not performing a forage analysis on your hay

Additionally, Kelcey said that most beef producers UNDERESTIMATE the weight of their mature cows.  Thus, they don't feed enough when calculating the 'proper' amount to feed. 

Horse owners typically feed hay that is "too" good for their horses, according to Kelcey.  When hay is too high of quality it passes through the gut too quickly and provides minimal nutritional benefit to the horse.  Kelcey also noted that it is critical to keep a horse's gut full ALL OF THE TIME!

Finally, trace mineral blocks are 99% salt and do not provide enough trace mineral to count for anything.  Kelcey said that you might as well lick your hand because that is the same amount of mineral content you would get from a trace mineral block. 
Hay Testing

If after reading the nutrition article above, you desire to get your forage tested, the Middle Park Conservation District can help you out with that. 

We have a hay corer available for you to take your samples. We can also send them into the lab for you and help you interpret them once the results are back.

Hay analyses are relative cheap for the amount of information you receive.  Costs range from $20-40 per sample depending on the number  and type of analyses you desire to have done.

Call our office at 970-724-3456 for more information or to borrow our hay core sampler.

Fuels Reduction Cost-Share Program

The Grand County Wildfire Council is offering private landowners and collective groups of private landowners the opportunity to apply for incentive cost-share funding in an effort to implement recommendations outlined in approved Community Wildfire Protection Plans (CWPPs). Funding and/or technical assistance is available to assist homeowners/landowners with completing defensible space and/or landscape-scale fuels reduction projects.

Applications will be accepted until July 1, 2017, or until available funding has been expended. Click on the links below for more information:

Questions?
Email bewildfireready@gmail.com or
contact the Program Administrator,
Mr. Paul Mintier at paul@pmcwildlandsystems.org

EQIP Funding Available! 

The Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) is a voluntary conservation program that helps agricultural producers in a manner that promotes agricultural production and environmental quality as compatible goals.  Through EQIP, agricultural producers receive financial and technical assistance to implement structural and management conservation practices that optimize environmental benefits on working agricultural land.

EQIP applications are accepted on a continuous basis, however, NRCS establishes application "cut-off" or submission deadline dates for evaluation, ranking and approval of eligible applications.  The "cut-off" date is usually MID-WINTER. 

If you are considering applying for EQIP prior to the mid-winter cut-off date, you should consult with Mark Volt, District Conservationist in the Kremmling Field Office, THIS FALL. 

Contact Mark at 970-724-3456

Upper Colorado River Watershed Group Community Conversations


Interested in watershed health and resiliency?

If so, join in on one of the four community conversations about our Grand County watershed future. A series of facilitated meetings in 2016 will help create the Upper Colorado River Watershed Group and a resilient watershed plan.  All interested parties are encouraged to attend these free, public events.

All events are from 6-9pm.

Refreshments will be provided. Families are welcome.

10/17/16 – Granby: Meeting at Mountain Parks Electric

10/25/16 – Grand Lake: Meeting at Town Hall

11/11/16 – Fraser: Meeting at the Historic Church

11/14/16 – Kremmling: Meeting at West Grand High School

Please RSVP @ www.ucrwg.org

Tire Tanks For Stock Water

Are you looking for a large, durable, freeze-resistant, self-thawing, and rust-free stock tank? 

Look no further, BUY A TIRE TANK!!!

Tire tanks are an alternative to traditional metal stock tanks for landowners trying to water their stock or wildlife.  Tire tanks are made from recycled heavy equipment tires that no longer provide safe driving conditions for operators.   The Middle Park Conservation District has tire tanks in stock.  Contact us to buy one!  970.724.3456



 

12 foot tanks: $895*
10 foot tanks: $750*
8 foot tanks: $500*
*Prices include sales tax

 

Proper Grazing Management:
The Last 3 inches DO NOT Belong to You!!!


Fall is a time when plants are starting to senesce.  They are diverting their energy from their leaves to their roots.  Some may assume that because the leaves are dying that it is okay to graze them down to nothing. Yet, did you know that several studies have suggested a strong correlation between the amount of leaf area removed and the percent of root growth stoppage?

 According to the chart below, the age of old saying of "Take Half, Leave Half" holds true.  By removing only half the amount of leave volume, you maximize your grazing and cutting potential while minimizing your roots loss at the same time.




You may feel tempted to graze your pastures for as long as you possibly can into the fall in an effort to save your hay for the winter, BUT keep in mind that

THE LAST 3 INCHES DO NOT BELONG TO YOU!!!!

Citizen's Qualitative
Habitat Evaluation Index


One of the annual youth education programs the Middle Park Conservation District participates in is the Grand County Water Information Network's Bug Week.  Grand County Water Information Network (GCWIN) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization who's mission is "to coordinate, manage and consolidate the comprehensive water quality monitoring, information and educational programs in Grand County, Colorado."

Bug Week is actually a 3-week long program that includes field days for both East Grand and West Grand 6th, 7th, and 8th graders, as well as East Grand 10th graders.  Students learn all about watershed health and resiliency, benthic macroinvertebrates, stream flows, as well as water rights.

One activity that we did with 8th graders and 10th graders was the "Citizen's Qualitative Habitat Evaluation Index (CQHEI)".  It is an activity that helps assess a stream's health and suitability for fish and invertebrate habitat.  It was originally developed by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency but is applicable here in Colorado as well. 

Download the file below and take it out to your favorite stretch of stream to see how it scores.  Generally, a score of 70 or higher is good.  When reading the rating descriptions on page 2, exchange "Warm Water Habitat" with "Cold Water Habitat".

Citizen's Qualitative Habitat Evaluation Index Guide
Forest Management for
Colorado Ranchers


Are you wondering if forest management in beetle-kill forest is cost effective?

If so, you should watch this short, 3-minute video by the Colorado State Forest Service and CSU Extension.  It talks about the dead timber values and how the profit from timber sales can often cover the cost of logging. 

Forest Management for Colorado Ranchers Video

If you have questions about forest management on your property, contact our local Professional Foresters at the Granby Office of the Colorado State Forest Service, 970-887-3121.
Petitioning Process Changes for the Endangered Species Act (ESA)


PRESS RELEASE

September 26, 2016

The Endangered Species Act (ESA) is the backbone of conservation efforts for America’s most imperiled plants and animals. It has helped prevent the extinctions of hundreds of species of plants and animals and promoted recovery efforts that have ensured future generations live in a world with bald eagles, American alligators and Steller sea lions. Beginning in 2011, the Obama administration has prioritized efforts to revise regulations and policies to make the ESA more effective, more transparent and easier to implement.

As part of that endeavor, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and NOAA Fisheries (together, the Services) – the agencies that implement the ESA – have improved the process by which species are petitioned for listing, delisting or reclassification under the ESA. The regulations also describe the process by which a petitioner may request revisions to critical habitat designations under the ESA. The revised ESA petition regulations will help ensure more complete and robust petitions that will lead to more effective conservation, greater involvement by state wildlife agencies, and provide greater transparency to the public.

Taken together, the revisions will allow the Services and their partners to better leverage limited resources to more effectively conserve America’s imperiled wildlife. Revisions to the petition regulations were originally proposed in May 2015 and today’s final revisions reflect extensive input from the public and stakeholders.

“The final revisions to the Endangered Species Act petition regulations reflect the thoughtful feedback and concerns of many partners, while staying true to our goal of improving both the quality of petitions and the ESA’s effectiveness,” said Dan Ashe, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director. “State wildlife agencies are critical partners in conserving wildlife in America and often possess the most up-to-date and relevant information on imperiled species, so making better use of their expertise makes good conservation sense.”

The final revisions to ESA listing petition regulations include:

Improved engagement with state wildlife agencies: Petitioners will be required to notify each state wildlife agency in which the species occurs at least 30 days before submitting the petition to the Services. This change will provide states an opportunity to submit pertinent information on petitioned species in time to inform our review.

Limitation on number of species per petition: Petitions will be limited to only one species per petition. A petition may still address any members of a single species as defined by the ESA, including the full species and one or more subspecies or varieties. For vertebrate species, this includes one or more distinct population segment (DPS).

This regulation will go into effect on October 27, 2016.

NOAA’s mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth's environment, from the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and to conserve and manage our coastal and marine resources.

Grand County Ballot Issue 1A
The following article is provided for informational purposes only.  The Middle Park Conservation District neither advocates for nor against this ballot issue.  We provide this information solely because it relates to conservation and the environment.  It is up to you to take the information provided and vote however you like.

 
 On August 9th, 2016, the Grand County Board of Commissioners voted unanimously to refer the Open Lands, River and Trails measure to the November 8th ballot. Ballots will be mailed to registered voters on October 17.
 
Details
 The Open Lands, Rivers and Trails measure, Issue 1A, will create a dedicated source of funding for land conservation, water conservation, and trails maintenance. This is a measure designed to enhance our water resources, protect working lands and scenic open space, conserve wildlife habitat and wetlands, and provide necessary maintenance for our trails.
 
How will this be paid for?
This measure is a county-wide, temporary .3% (three-tenths of one percent) sales tax.
 
How long will this tax last?

This temporary sales tax will expire in 10 years.
 
How will these funds be administered?
The passage of this measure will lead to the creation of an Open Lands Fund. Only up to 5% of the Open Lands Fund can be used to administer the program while the rest must be used for land and water conservation, and trails maintenance. Grand County, the municipalities within the County, and qualified non-profit organizations can apply for grants from the Open Lands Fund. An Open Lands Advisory Committee, representative of Grand County, will review the competitive grant applications and make recommendations to the Grand County Board of Commissioners on spending.

 
BALLOT TITLE
 
OPEN LANDS, RIVERS AND TRAILS MEASURE

 
BALLOT ISSUE
 
SHALL GRAND COUNTY TAXES BE INCREASED SEVEN-HUNDRED FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS AND BY WHATEVER AMOUNTS RAISED ANNUALLY, BEGINNING JANUARY 1, 2017, AND AUTOMATICALLY EXPIRING AFTER TEN YEARS, FROM A THREE TENTHS OF ONE PERCENT (0.3%) SALES TAX LEVY, WHICH WILL NOT BE COLLECTED ON SALES OF PRESCRIPTION DRUGS, TO BE USED SOLELY FOR:

 
  • KEEPING WATER IN THE COLORADO RIVER AND OTHER RIVERS, LIKE THE FRASER RIVER, AVAILABLE FOR AGRICULTURE, RANCHING,AND OUTDOOR RECREATION;
  • CONSERVING AGRICULTURAL LANDS, NATURAL AREAS, SCENIC OPEN LANDS, WILDLIFE HABITAT, WETLANDS, AND RIVER ACCESS THROUGH ACQUISITION; AND
  • MAINTAINING HIKING AND BIKING TRAILS
WITH ALL EXPENDITURES SUBJECT TO THE RECOMMENDATIONS OF A CITIZEN ADVISORY COMMITTEE, AN ANNUAL INDEPENDENT AUDIT, AND A CAP ON ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES OF FIVE PERCENT; AND SHALL THE COUNTY BE AUTHORIZED TO COLLECT, RETAIN AND SPEND THE PROCEEDS OF THE REVENUE FROM SUCH TAXES AND ANY EARNINGS THEREON WITHOUT LIMITATION OR CONDITION AS A VOTER-APPROVED REVENUE CHANGE UNDER ARTICLE X, SECTION 20 OF THE COLORADO CONSTITUTION OR ANY OTHER LAW?
The content of this newsletter is for Educational Purposes ONLY.  We have attempted to site opinions, beliefs and viewpoints from various sources and professionals.  These opinions do not necessarily reflect the opinions, beliefs and viewpoints of the Middle Park Conservation District or its Board of Supervisors/Employees.  It is always recommended that you seek independent advice before implementing new management practices.
Copyright © 2016 Middle Park Conservation District, All rights reserved.


unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences 

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp