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FY2021 Q1
 
Healing Focus
A Quarterly Digest from NCB
New Year’s Greetings! On behalf of the Center for Victims of Torture National Capacity Building Project, and our partner, the Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma, we would like to convey our warmest wishes to all of you and your programs for a more hopeful and productive year.
 
Since March of last year, Survivors of Torture programs across the United States have had to rapidly adapt and innovate in order to effectively reach especially vulnerable clients – asylum seekers, immigrants, refugees, survivors of torture. They are among the least protected from and most impacted by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, mental health crisis, and socioeconomic dislocations. Many are traumatized by these compounding crises and stressors that are personal, familial, and communal. Our Community of Practice is also experiencing multiple risk exposures, significant barriers to service delivery, and vicarious traumatization. 

And yet, we can look forward to 2021 with a renewed sense of optimism and purpose, particularly with the advancement of COVID-19 vaccines. The promise of the incoming Biden-Harris administration to “reassert America’s commitment to asylum-seekers and refugees” brings further hope and opportunity for our clients and communities to heal, rebuild, and thrive.
 
We are also hopeful that, as a Community of Practice, these crises over the past year are bringing us closer together, in becoming even more deeply engaged with our clients and their communities. And we can emerge with greater creativity and collaboration, learning and sharing new ideas for improving our practices, and redoubling our commitment to refugee mental health overall and torture treatment in particular.
 
Lastly, we are grateful for these thoughtful words from our colleague, Dr. Hawthorne Smith of Bellevue Program for Survivors of Torture, “Hope is something you do, as opposed to something you have. It is a behavior, a comportment, and a commitment that allows us to utilize the wisdom and courage we all possess.”
 

Healtorture.org Updates

Our content now speaks with ReadSpeaker! Click to learn more. Includes image of speaker icon.
Healtorture.org has been updated with a new feature which provides more accessibility to our content. With ReadSpeaker webReader, the content of our website can be read aloud to you. Just one click, and the text on a web page is simultaneously read aloud and highlighted so you can easily follow along, regardless of device or where you may be. This makes the content more accessible and visiting the website is a more enriching experience. The webReader icon is located the top of every page on the site and can be activated by clicking the Listen button shown below.

Screenshot of listen button

For more information on this new feature, click here.


Planning, Monitoring, Evaluation, and Research (PMER) eLearning Series, now available. Includes icon of clip board.
NCB has updated the Planning, Monitoring, Evaluation, and Research (PMER) eLearning Series to be easier to use across all browsers by republishing the lessons using HTML5, instead of Flash Player. This five-lesson series, was developed by CVT's Partners in Trauma Healing (PATH) project in collaboration with the National Capacity Building Project (NCB), giving participants a shared understanding of the basics of Planning, Monitoring, Evaluation, and Research. Please note that our online eLearning Series requires you to have an account on Healtorture.org as either a member or as an eLearning Subscriber and signed in. Click here to request an account if you don't have one. 
 

CVT's PATH Bibliography Q3 2020
CVT's Partners in Trauma Healing (PATH) creates bibliographies every quarter of resources for current literature on the topic of the mental health status of and treatments for torture survivors, war trauma survivors, refugees, and asylum seekers. This also includes research in the areas of social work that relate directly to the psychological well-being of these populations. The bibliography includes peer-reviewed journal article citations in these areas; select original summaries of those articles; and links to the publicly available abstracts and full-text versions of these articles. This bibliography is updated and distributed on a quarterly basis and does not currently include articles on policy or advocacy. Click here to view the Q3 2020 bibliography.

Highlights of this quarter's bibliography include article summaries on:

  • Perceptions and health-seeking behaviour for mental illness among Syrian refugees and Lebanese community members in Wadi Khaled, North Lebanon: A qualitative study
  • Microaggression and everyday resistance in narratives of refugee resettlement
  • Asylum-seeking children with resignation syndrome: catatonia or traumatic withdrawal syndrome?

Other topics include: children and youth, health and well-being, refugees, and women.

From our Colleagues

When racial trauma is a chief complaint among health-care staff
We are pleased to share this article written by Dr. Richard F. Mollica, Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma and  Dr. Dinali Fernando, Libertas Center for Human Rights. This article was published by The Lancet and can be read by clicking here.
 



The Bellevue Program for Survivors of Torture (PSOT) hosted their 2020 Annual Benefit: A virtual, online celebration
During this event the PSOT family from around the world came together for a virtual experience honoring defenders of human rights and exceptional members of their global community. For their 25th Anniversary they celebrated individuals and organizations that have made a lasting impact on their program. Click here to watch the recording of this event.
 




The NCTTP Annual Symposium is going virtual in March 2021!
 Please watch your email for dates and times.
 



Hawthorne Smith's Directors Corner
Dr. Hawthorne Smith, Director of the Bellevue Program for Survivors of Torture shared some inspirational year end musings in his December Director's Corner, please click here to read.
 


Upcoming Webinars:

January 12th at 1:00 pm Eastern Time:
Risk Management Strategies in Response to Covid-19

The National Council for Behavioral Health will be hosting this webinar. Participants are invited to submit their questions to Ron Zimmet, JD, general counsel for Mental Health Risk Retention Group (MHRRG). Other field executives such as Joe Parks, MD, medical director and vice president of practice improvement at the National Council are also set to speak. Click here to register.

January 19th at 11:00 am Eastern Time
How to Provide Person-Centered, Trauma-Informed Care to Older Refugees.
The International Rescue Committee’s New Jersey Office for Refugees has partnered with The JFNA Center on Aging and Trauma in for this webinar. During this webinar, experts will share critical emerging trends in aging and trauma and strategies in how to support older adults with a history of trauma, including older refugees. This trauma will be discussed through a holistic and person-centered lens. Click here to register.
 



The Center for Disease Control and Prevention: Research Funding Opportunity

The Office of Refugee Resettlement and The CDC logosOn December 30, 2020, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released RFA-CE-21-004, Research Grants for Preventing Violence and Violence-Related Injury. CDC intends to commit up to $1,050,000 in FY 2021 to fund up to three applications. CDC is soliciting investigator-initiated research that will help expand and advance the understanding about what works to prevent violence that impacts children and youth, collectively referred to as Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). Click here for more information.
 

The Bellevue Program for Survivors of Torture (PSOT) hosted their 2020 Annual Benefit: A virtual, online celebration
During this event the PSOT family from around the world came together for a virtual experience honoring defenders of human rights and exceptional members of their global community. For their 25th Anniversary they celebrated individuals and organizations that have made a lasting impact on their program. Click here to watch the recording of their inspiring event.

From the Team

We hope you, your staff, your clients, and your family are safe and healthy. Please feel free to reach out to us to let us know how you are doing, what you are up to, and if there are ways that we can help by emailing Sara Bracewell.

Healing Focus is a quarterly digest from The National Capacity Building Project at the Center for Victims of Torture that shares news and resources on torture survivor rehabilitation. Meet our team.

Also, if you would like to suggest a topic you would like us to cover in one of these digests, please let us know! For additional tools, resources, and trainings on working with survivors, visit HealTorture.org.

 


Yours,
The National Capacity Building Project
 
Advancing the science of torture survivor rehabilitation by promoting integrated, sustainable care for survivors across the United States.
CVT's National Capacity Building Project received $400,000 through competitive funding through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Grant #90ZT0187. The contents of this website are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families.

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