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CPAP treatment may reduce chance of dementia in elderly - Six hours or less sleep increases dementia risk in middle age by 30% - Sleeping Disorders Centre moves to online clinics - Try the Snore Centre Mobile App
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Snore Centre eNewsletter May 2021

CPAP treatment may reduce chance of dementia in elderly

A new study reported on by MHealthLab and MailOnline and published in the journal Sleep finds older adults who received positive airway pressure therapy prescribed for obstructive sleep apnea may be less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease and other kinds of dementia. 

Researchers from Michigan Medicine’s Sleep Disorders Centers analyzed Medicare claims of more than 50,000 Medicare beneficiaries ages 65 and older who had been diagnosed with OSA. In this nationally representative study, they examined if those people who used positive airway pressure therapy were less likely to receive a new diagnosis of dementia or mild cognitive impairment over the next 3 years, compared to people who did not use positive airway pressure.

“We found a significant association between positive airway pressure use and lower risk of Alzheimer’s and other types of dementia over three years, suggesting that positive airway pressure may be protective against dementia risk in people with OSA,” says lead author Galit Levi Dunietz, Ph.D., M.P.H., an assistant professor of neurology and a sleep epidemiologist.

The findings stress the impact of sleep on cognitive function. “If a causal pathway exists between OSA treatment and dementia risk, as our findings suggest, diagnosis and effective treatment of OSA could play a key role in the cognitive health of older adults,” says study principal investigator Tiffany J. Braley, M.D., M.S., an associate professor of neurology. 


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Six hours or less sleep increases dementia risk in middle age by 30%



Ian Sample, Guardian Science Editor reports that people who regularly sleep for six hours or less each night in middle age are more likely to develop dementia than those who routinely manage seven hours, according to a major study into the disease.

Researchers found a 30% greater risk of dementia in those who during their 50s, 60s and 70s consistently had a short night’s sleep, regardless of other risk factors such as heart and metabolic conditions and poor mental health.

The study does not prove that sleeping too little causes dementia, since sleep loss itself may be one of the earliest symptoms of the disease. But some scientists believe the results bolster evidence that persistent poor sleep may at least contribute to the neurodegenerative disease. Researchers do not know whether improving sleep can reduce the risk of dementia, but sleep is known to clear toxic waste from the brain. One hypothesis is that when people sleep less, this process becomes impaired.

“These findings suggest that sleep duration might be a risk factor for dementia in later life,” said Dr Séverine Sabia, an author of the study at the University of Paris. “I cannot tell you that sleep duration is a cause of dementia but it may contribute to its development.”

Sabia and her colleagues analysed survey data from University College London’s Whitehall II study, which launched in 1985 and followed the health and lifestyles of more than 10,000 British volunteers. The French team focused on nearly 8,000 participants who self-reported their sleep patterns, although some wore watch-like devices to confirm how long they slept.

During 25 years of follow-up, 521 participants developed dementia, with most diagnosed in their late 70s. Writing in Nature Communications, the scientists described how those who routinely got six hours of sleep or less each night in their 50s and 60s were 30% more likely to develop dementia than those who typically managed seven hours.
 

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Sleeping Disorders Centre moves to online clinics

Since the outbreak of COVID-19 attending hospitals and clinics in person has been difficult and potentially involves the risk of catching or spreading coronavirus. Therefore, the Sleeping Disorders Centre's services are now available  online for both NHS and private patients.

We are able to deliver the same high quality service either via telephone or online, organising all aspects of care remotely: including sleep studies, diagnosis, CPAP fitting, delivery, maintenance and long-term care.

This means that people suffering from obstructive sleep apnoea and other sleep-related and ENT conditions are still able to access first class care from Mr. Oko, Professor Dhillon and the rest of our clinical team. Our mission to raise awareness of the suffering caused by sleep apnoea, and enable those affected to live normal lives through fast diagnosis and effective treatment, is still continuing depite the challenges of the pandemic.

The Sleeping Disorders Centre's private clinic has moved from Harley Street to The London Digestive Centre, in partnership with HCA Healthcare. All appointments with Mr. Oko are taking place by phone or online, and in person appointments continuing with Prof. Dhillon.



Contact details

Private patients
The London Digestive Centre
41 Welbeck Street
London
Telephone: 020 3797 7248
Email: david.odimayo@sleepthebestmedicine.com

 

Michael Oko speaks to Look North about how to stay healthy in case of COVID-19 infection
 

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Be sure to let us know what you think of our app by leaving a review on iTunes or the Google Play Store. All your feedback is valuable to us.

 

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