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Snore Centre now offers online video consultaitons - Coronavirus has led to a rise in "sleep divorce" - Extra 20 mins walk a day reduces sleep apnoea risk - No evidence CPAP use increases coronavirus risk - BBC Stories - Try the Snore Centre Mobile App - Michael Oko explains cardiac anatomy
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Snore Centre eNewsletter July 2020

Snore Centre now offers online video consultations via Doctify

Given the current crisis with many people's movements severely restricted The Snore Centre has set up an online consultation service in partnership with Doctify



Patients can now access our first class sleep service from their own homes without having to risk travel or attending a clinic in person.

Doctify is revolutionising the global healthcare market, enabling patients to search, book and review clinics and hospitals online. They strongly believe in the benefit of patient reviews and how they strengthen the patient-specialist relationship: empowering people to make informed decisions, as well as recognising the exceptional dedication of clinics and hospitals.

Coronavirus has led to a rise in "Sleep Divorce"

Still sleeping wih your partner? Thanks to strict advice about self-isolation and social distancing, for many couples, sharing a bed is now a thing of the past. 



Sleeping separately, otherwise termed as sleep divorce has caused heated debate over the years. It is greatly based on the link that sleeping together is an intimate act. Not only do couples do it to feel more secure in their relationship, but also because it goes hand in hand with sex. Most people argue that sleeping together equals a good sex life which isn't true. Good communication equals a great sex life. Therefore, how can sleeping apart possibly save your relationship?

Sleep apnea

If one of you is snoring or has sleep apnea, it may be challenging to your spouse. If anything, it only aggravates your spouse the more. Sleeping in a separate room in this case is more beneficial to both of you. When you elaborate as to the reason behind your separate sleeping, it gets better.

Sex

In matters of sex, sleeping apart for a while can boost your relationship in that, you'll feel the need to be more deliberate in having sex. You are more aware of what you two are missing and may end up making better effort in solving any conflict then resuming to have a more fulfilling sex life.

Work schedules

Consider if your spouse has a different work schedule. If either of you is a lark while the other is an owl, sleeping separately could work in your favor. The best way to go through this is if you communicate about your situation. If your partner is asleep, coming to disrupt them can create resentment. The best way is spending time to compensate for the time apart even if you sleep separately.

Family emergencies

Having a family experience that demands you sleep separately is also a factor to consider. For instance, if the baby is sick or you need to attend to a newborn, sleeping in separate beds is inevitable. It can actually help you both let off some steam and not end up actually brewing more hardship within your relationship.

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Extra 20 minutes walk a day reduces sleep apnoea risk


A study published online as an accepted paper in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine found that increased physical activity is associated with a lower risk of obstructive sleep apnea, a common sleep-related breathing disorder. The study is the largest to date focused on the relationship between sleep apnea and levels of physical activity in the general community.

Researchers reviewed lifestyle, medical, socio-demographic and sleep health data collected from more than 155,000 adults participating in the Ontario Health Study. Based on the physical activity of participants with and without sleep apnea, the investigators determined that a modest increase in physical activity, including walking, is associated with a 10 percent reduction in the risk of developing sleep apnea.

The authors found that adding 20 minutes to a daily walk and increasing vigorous daily activity by eight minutes would be enough to achieve a lower sleep apnea risk. The finding is independent of other known risk factors for sleep apnea such as sex, age, ethnicity and obesity.

It is estimated that more than 29 million American adults have sleep apnea, many of them undiagnosed. Untreated sleep apnea is associated with an increased risk of heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure and other potentially serious conditions.

"The rates of sleep apnea in children and adults are continuing to rise. Therefore, understanding the role of modifiable protective factors for sleep apnea is important," said Palmer. "Exercise is one such protective factor and has many other positive effects on general health. Sleep health care professionals should be trying to get their patients to exercise more."

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No evidence CPAP use increases coronavirus risk

There is no current evidence that CPAP use increases the risk for getting or developing complications of coronavirus (COVID-19). However, many patients with OSA may also have other long term health problems that may increase their risk. Please ensure that if you are affected by any other conditions that you check if they are relevant for COVID-19.

OSA Alliance advice for CPAP users:

  • People with OSA should continue to use their CPAP at home as normal.
  • There is no evidence that using CPAP makes you more likely to catch COVID-19, and nothing to suggest that CPAP will make you more unwell if you do catch it.
  • If a CPAP user becomes unwell with symptoms suggestive of COVID-19 (new cough and fever > 37.8 C), please follow government guidance regarding self and household isolation.
  • We do not know whether CPAP makes virus spread worse within a household. This will be something you will need to consider when deciding whether or not to continue using CPAP if you are self-isolating with symptoms of COVID-19. You may wish to distance yourself from vulnerable household members by changing bedrooms or stopping CPAP for a short time.
  • Any respiratory infection, particularly with a blocked nose, can make it more difficult to use CPAP. Try and persist, but if wearing CPAP makes you feel worse (e.g. by increasing coughing and disturbing sleep), then stop using it until your respiratory symptoms improve. Sleeping more upright, avoiding alcohol and using a mandibular advancement spilt if you have one, may help as alternatives to CPAP in reducing OSA a little in this period. Your OSA symptoms are likely to worsen over the week, but will resolve when you restart CPAP.
  • Routine hygiene is adequate for infection control: changing machine filters routinely, cleaning surfaces, cleaning mask and tubing with hand-hot soapy water (washing up liquid) and washing hands regularly.
  • Masks and machines should not be shared.
  • Please use the telephone number/email address provided by your sleep centre for urgent issues with your equipment or sleep/OSA related symptoms. Do not attend in person unless instructed to do so. Please be aware the team may not be able to respond quickly, as staff may have been moved to Emergency Services.
  • Please look after masks and tubing carefully as there may be a temporary shortage in the future.
  • A reminder that DVLA says anyone with excessive sleepiness having or likely to have an adverse effect on driving must not drive.

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BBC Stories: Are you holding your breath in your sleep?




Watch the video on the BBC
 
 

Have You Tried Our Mobile App?

 

 
Keep up with all the latest news and research on sleep apnoea from the Sleeping Disorders Centre with this nifty free app. Here you can find all our social media channels (YouTube/Facebook/Twitter/Blog) all in one place, right on your phone.

Be sure to let us know what you think of our app by leaving a review on iTunes or the Google Play Store. All your feedback is valuable to us.

 

Download the app for Android devices

Download the app for iOS devices


Michael Oko explains cardiac anatomy using virtual reality  ​


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