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The Local Monkey King
Many of you may already know that there are macaques in country parks in Hong Kong. However, how well do you know about their ecology and conservation?

Wild monkeys are mainly distributed in Kam Shan, Lion Rock, Shing Mun Country Parks and Tai Po Kau Nature Reserve in Hong Kong. The species includes Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta), Long-tailed Macaque (M. fascicularis) and their hybrids. Hong Kong falls within the range of natural distribution of the Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta). However, the original wild stock is believed to have become extirpated. The existing wild monkey populations are considered as the descendants of the individuals which have been introduced to the Kowloon Hills, i.e. Kam Shan and Lion Rock Country Parks in the 1910s.
In the past, provision of food by humans resulted in the rapid increase in numbers of the local macaque populations. In order to encourage macaques to revert to the countryside for natural food and to manage the local population, the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department (AFCD) banned feeding macaques by law in 1999 and contracted the contraceptive programme for female macaques via endoscopic tubectomy to OPCFHK since 2009. In 2014, OPCFHK also started performing endoscopic vasectomies on males. Being one of the mitigation efforts in dealing with the rising issue of human macaque conflicts, the contraceptive programme has successfully reduced the birth rate by more than half, from over 60% in 2009 to below 30% in recent years. Since the programme started, over 1,300 females and 240 males have been sterilised.
In addition to the operation, which occurs every two weeks on average, two OPCFHK Survey Officers survey at different country parks daily to collect important data on the current status of the macaques, including their habitat use and range, demography and birth rate of individual troops. These data are vital for assessing the success of the contraceptive programme as well as for future planning in managing this population.

With Hong Kong being a small city with dense human population, many people may overlook her rich biodiversity. In fact, there are many mammals in Hong Kong, with more than 50 species recorded, including macaques. To protect the precious biodiversity in Hong Kong, we need your help too! Remember not to feed them if you see them in the countryside. When they no longer associate people with food, they would remain in countryside in search of natural food, reducing negative human macaque interactions and allowing them to return to the most natural living environment.
Run for Survival 2020
Postponement Announcement
In response to the latest developments regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19), also taking into account the health and safety of the participants, volunteers, and staff, “Run for Survival 2020” (originally scheduled for 22 March 2020) will be postponed.
 
Ocean Park Conservation Foundation, Hong Kong (OPCFHK) apologises for any inconvenience caused and appreciates your understanding. For updates about the event, please refer to the OPCFHK website, Run for Survival website, or our Facebook and Instagram pages.
 
Should you have any other enquiries, please contact us at (852) 3923 2157 or email to opcf@oceanpark.com.hk.
Event Updates
Open Day Cancellation
In response to the latest situation of novel coronavirus infection, Ocean Park has been temporarily closed until further notice.Ocean Park Conservation Foundation, Hong Kong has decided to cancel the monthly open day at the Hong Kong Marine Life Stranding and Education Centre on 8 March. We apologise for any inconvenience caused.

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Ocean Park Conservation Foundation, Hong Kong
Ocean Park, Aberdeen, Hong Kong

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