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Don't Feed Wild Animals!
Spending more time outdoor may have become the new norm under COVID-19 when gatherings and crowded places should be avoided. When you go hiking, do you also pay attention to the little things – plants and wild creatures around you? With Hong Kong being a small city with dense human population, many people may overlook her rich biodiversity. In fact, there are many mammals in Hong Kong, with more than 50 species recorded, including monkeys and wild pigs.
When monkeys and wild pigs are mentioned, what immediately comes to mind may be the disturbance they bring to us and the community. However, do you know that human feeding actually appears to be one of the major causes of inducing the unnatural growth of monkey and wild pig population in Hong Kong in recent years? Through frequent contacts with humans, these wild animals might lose their instinctive fear to humans and become habituated to stay near the urban area to approach human for food. Some of them might even become aggressive and stray into nearby urban settlement for searching of abandoned rubbish, or snatching plastic bags from human and causing human-wild animals conflict in the society.

To abate the conflict, Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department (AFCD) has adopted multiple approaches, including the enactment of feeding ban under Wild Animals Protection Ordinance in 1999 and the implementation of contraceptive programme for long-term control of the monkey and wild pig population. Meanwhile, various education and publicity programmes have also been implemented by AFCD to educate the public about the negative consequence of feeding wild animal, as well as the preventive measures against human-wildlife conflicts.
Since 2018, Ocean Park Conservation Foundation, Hong Kong (OPCFHK) has been appointed by AFCD to organise and manage the first fauna education programme – “Don’t Feed Wild Animals” Programme, aiming to reach out the public at feeding blackspots and deliver the message of not feeding wild animals during the contract period.

With the aim to further engage the public, in addition to school talks, a series of outreaching education activities including guided tours and educational booths around the subject are performed at Piper’s Hill Car Park and Kam Shan or Lion Rock Country Parks during weekends and/or public holidays. The “Don’t Feed Wild Animals” Programme focuses on raising public awareness and encouraging them to respect wildlife. Since 2018, over 13,000 people received a better understanding of the natural behaviours of wild animals and the importance of not feeding them through guided tours and educational booths.


If you want to learn more about the Programme, or join us and be our volunteer, please visit our website.

Moreover, we will introduce some unique species in Hong Kong on our social media channels (@OPCFHK on Facebook and Instagram) in May. Stay close with us to discover beautiful wildlife and nature in Hong Kong.
UPDATE: Suspending Class without
Suspending Learning

While school is still suspended for students, we always encourage them not to stop learning. The Juvenile Horseshoe Crab Rearing Programme of OPCFHK has prepared a series of horseshoe crab fun facts for you all to learn more about this precious species. 

What is the story behind the Chinese character of horseshoe crab?
How is their unique body structure effective for survival?
What does a juvenile horseshoe crab look like?

Follow us on our Facebook for the latest updates, or check out the following hashtags for previous posts!


#HSCfunfacts

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Ocean Park Conservation Foundation, Hong Kong
Ocean Park, Aberdeen, Hong Kong

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