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IN THIS ISSUE:
  • Malawi's first wildlife detection dogs now in action
  • LWT ambassador Ian Redmond co-hosts primate course
  • Orphan season starts early this year
  • WERU de-snares two zebras 
  • Wildlife Centre holds women's workshop 
  • Elephant project IDs over 100 individuals
  • Pedal power cinema tours Kasungu

2018 IMPACT IN NUMBERS

Thanks to your support, this is our impact to date this year...
SNIFFING OUT WILDLIFE CRIME

Malawi’s first Wildlife Detection Dog Unit (WDDU) is now in action, following an official launch at Kamuzu International Airport in Lilongwe. The unit and its four dogs, Tim, Buba, Max and Nikita, have begun their search for ivory, rhino horn, pangolin scales, animal skins, hippo teeth, bushmeat, firearms and ammunition and other contraband in luggage, cargo, freight and post, and on transport. Detection dogs have a sense of smell 40 times greater than that of humans and can detect even the smallest amounts of illegal wildlife products. Thanks to the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) for funding the project. Read more about the WDDU here.

LWT AMBASSADOR IAN REDMOND CO-HOSTS PRIMATE CONSERVATION COURSE

Conservationist and LWT ambassador Ian Redmond OBE recently joined us in Malawi to co-host our first primate conservation course. The students studied vervets, baboons and blue monkeys at Lilongwe Wildlife Centre, Vwaza Marsh Wildlife Reserve and Nyika National Park, learning about primate conservation, radio tracking, field survey techniques, telemetry and primate reintroduction management. Click here for more photos from the ten-day course.
2018 ORPHAN SEASON STARTS EARLY

While orphan season normally starts in November, July saw the arrival of two orphan primates. Kumbali, a vervet monkey, was only a few days old when he was rescued. He needed 24-hour care as his temperature had dropped to 35 degrees, so he was kept against the bodies of our veterinary team throughout the night to keep him warm. Fox, a yellow baboon, was in a similar situation when he arrived at the Wildlife Centre just six days later, having been found alone at the side of a busy road near Nkhata Bay. We’re pleased to say that both orphans are now doing well. If you would like to help us care for them and our other animals, please consider adopting Kumbali or Fox, or even coming out to Malawi to help us as a volunteer!

WERU DE-SNARES TWO ZEBRA 

Last month, Lilongwe Wildlife Trust was alerted to two male zebras entangled in snares at Kuti Wildlife Reserve. Our Wildlife Emergency Response Unit (WERU) vet Amanda tracked down and darted the animals and, with the help of Kuti rangers and LWT's Clinical Projects in One Health (CPOH) vet externs, who are located at Kuti, she successfully removed the snares. A big thanks to everyone at Kuti, as well as the Olsen Animal Trust and Born Free Foundation for sponsoring WERU. You can read more about the rescue and our CPOH project here.

LWT HOLDS WORKSHOP FOR WOMEN

We recently carried out a four-day learning exchange and training workshop to provide an opportunity for women’s groups to come together and share their skills in a variety of activities, including soap making, organic gardening, briquette making, and seedling cultivation. The workshop was in collaboration with Women Together, an upcoming organisation that works with women to implement income-generating activities within their communities. Everyone had a great time and we are extremely grateful to all those involved who made the workshop such a success!

ELEPHANTS FOR LANDSCAPES PROJECT IDENTIFIES
100 INDIVIDUALS

The elephant in this photo is Flo, one of the many individuals identified and profiled as part of our Elephants For Landscapes project, based at the Malawi Wildlife Research Institute (MAWIRI) in the beautiful Vwaza Marsh Wildlife Reserve. The project, which is in partnership with Elephants For Africa, has now identified over 100 elephants. Volunteers can join the programme for two to 12 weeks, while BSc, MSc, MRes or PhD students can undertake a long-term project with us. Click here for more information or email lilongwewildlife@gmail.com

KASUNGU CHILDREN ENJOY PEDAL POWER CINEMA TOUR

And finally, our Pedal Power Cinema visited Kasungu last month, showing LWT's two conservation education films - Elephant I Miss You and 30 Years - to over 1,000 people in five communities on the border of Kasungu National Park. Thank you to USAID and IFAW for sponsoring the project.

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