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IN THIS ISSUE:
  • LWT gets the Royal treatment
  • WERU's pangolin rescue
  • 7 traffickers convicted, with sentences up to 13 years in prison
  • Footballers pledge to protect Malawi's wildlife
  • MPCC tackles foresty legislation
  • Join one of our exciting research projects!

2018 IMPACT IN NUMBERS

Thanks to your support, this is our impact to date this year...
LWT GETS THE ROYAL TREATMENT

We celebrated our 10th anniversary in style last month with a visit from our Royal patron, HRH the Duke of Gloucester. The Duke's four-day trip to Malawi also helped to shine a spotlight on the progress that Malawi is making in its fight against wildlife crime and their strong partnership with the UK. After attending the Trust's 10th anniversary celebrations at the Wildlife Centre, the Duke joined LWT's Executive Director, the British High Commissioner and members of the Malawi Parliamentary Conservation Caucus at a Presidential dinner at State House. LWT staff then accompanied him to Liwonde National Park to learn about the work of African Parks, as well as our Wildlife Emergency Response Unit, and to see the newly introduced lions. Read more here.

WERU'S PANGOLIN RESCUE


WERU had another busy month, with one rescue being that of a pangolin. She was brought to the Wildlife Centre for a check-up by the authorities after a would-be trafficker lost his nerve and dropped her at the airport.  Pangolins are the world's most trafficked mammal, with their scales being used in Chinese medicine. This one was active and in good general condition, weighing 10.5kg. She received some fluids for hydration, before she set off on her journey back to the wild. A big thanks for the Born Free Foundation and the Olsen Animal Trust for sponsoring WERU!
IVORY TRAFFICKER GETS 13 YEARS IN JAIL

There were seven convictions for wildlife trafficking in March, for crimes including possession and dealing of raw ivory, elephant bones and hippo teeth. Congratulations to all the magistrates involved for taking wildlife crime seriously. One case involved 7.4kg of elephant ivory, worth MWK10,360,000 ($14,300). Kennedy Ten was arrested on the 19th January in Kasungu and charged with possession and dealing of a listed species. He pleaded not guilty but was sentenced to 13 years in jail.
 

FOOTBALLERS PLEDGE TO PROTECT WILDLIFE

Malawi premiere football teams Silver Strikers and TN Stars visited Kasungu National Park last month to learn more about the issues facing the country's wildlife. The players met Kasungu's rangers, learning about the important work they do to fight wildlife crime, and subsequently pledged their support to protect Malawi's wildlife and environment. The day ended with a friendly (ish!) football match between TN Stars and Kasungu's rangers, which finished in a 2-2 draw. See more photos here.

MPCC TACKLES FORESTRY REGISTRATION

The Malawi Parliamentary Conservation Caucus was in full swing this month. Member MPs kindly helped us to host the Duke and also held a very productive workshop with the Inter-Agency Wildlife Committee to Combat Wildlife Crime (IACCWC) to push for the amendment of the Forestry Act. Malawi has the highest rate of deforestation in the SADC region of Africa and new legislation is vital for cracking down on illegal logging activity and the organised trafficking of charcoal. The MPCC programme is funded by GEF and USFWS via ICCF and is implemented by Lilongwe Wildlife Trust. Read more on the forestry meeting here.

JOIN ONE OF OUR EXCITING RESEARCH PROJECTS

Our Elephants For Landscapes research project is underway in Vwaza Marsh Wildlife Reserve, with volunteers and research students observing, photographing and collecting data on the elephants. Many of the herds have been seen close to camp, and there are plenty of calves this year, too! Meanwhile, our Samango monkey project has also just launched, with the first set of data being collected in and around Senga Bay on Lake Malawi. Future collection sites include Ntchisi Forest Reserve and Nyika National Park. Fancy getting involved in one of these fantastic projects? Email lilongwewildlife@gmail.com for more information. 

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