Copy
Happenings, book reviews, new publications, upcoming events, the latest from the blog and more.
View this email in your browser
HCG is a broad-based group of trainers, teachers and experts from multiple disciplines committed to deep diversity, equity and social justice. The purpose of our newsletter is to share what we're up to and to highlight resources, organizations and folks in the struggle working for a more equitable and healthy world. We are so thankful to be in community with you and  welcome your feedback.  If you have content you would like to share with our online learning community of
over 2,500 people, please send it our way.

“To build community requires vigilant awareness of the work we must continually do to undermine all the socialization that leads us to behave in ways that perpetuate domination.”  ―
bell hooks, Teaching Community: A Pedagogy of Hope
Table of Contents
Featured Upcoming HCG Presentations & Conference Workshops
The NCORE conference is coming up in Portland, OR May 28-June 1, 2019. Join Dr. Hackman at her pre-conference session “The Body Already Knows: A Pathway to Racial Justice” on May 28. HCG will be tabling and doing other concurrent sessions, so please come see us!
Featured Organization
Today’s environmental challenges are greater than ever. But we live in a country of strong environmental laws—and Earthjustice holds those who break our nation’s laws accountable for their actions.

Earthjustice has been the legal backbone for thousands of organizations, large and small. Behind nearly every major environmental win, you'll find Earthjustice.

As the nation’s largest nonprofit environmental law organization, they leverage their expertise and commitment to fight for justice and advance the promise of a healthy world for all. They represent all of their clients free of charge.

Donate to EarthJustice
Conferences & Events We Support
Othering and Belonging Conference
April 8-10, 2019 in Oakland, CA

The Greenlining Institute's Economic Summit
April 26, 2019 in Oakland, CA

National Summit for Educational Equity
April 28-May 2, 2019 in Arlington, VA

People of the Global Majority ONE Summit
May 8 – 10, 2019 in Philadelphia, PA

NCORE Conference
May 28-June 1, 2019 in Portland, OR

NetRoots Nation
July 11-13 in Piladelphia, PA


International Drug Policy Reform Conference
Nov. 6-9, 2019 in St. Louis, Missouri

Northeast Sustainable Ag. Working Group Coalition Conference
Nov. 7-9 in Jersey City, NJ


Community Food Systems Conference
Dec. 9-11 in Savannah, GA

Race Forward’s Building Racial Equity series is a collection of interactive trainings for those who wish to sharpen their skills and strategies to address structural racism and advance racial equity. Check here for dates and locations throughout 2019.
Recommended Articles & Resources
Swedish Teen climate activist Greta Thunberg has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize. Here Greta makes a historic statement to the world's glitterati, political, business, banking and entertainment celebrities. Watch her TEDx talk here.
How Tribes Are Harnessing Cutting-Edge Data to Plan for Climate Change
Climate change is already damaging Indigenous ways of life. But tribes are adapting.
Why Students of Color Are Stepping Up to Lead Climate Strikes

The youth-led movement builds on the momentum of the increasingly Black and Brown leadership behind the Green New Deal.

YES! Magazine
We can empower children to be a part of the solution.

YES! Magazine

Congresswoman hit back at Republicans who claim her resolution would cause ‘genocide’ and the end of hamburgers

The Guardian

Report: The State of the Global Climate in 2018

Every year, the World Meteorological Organization issues a Statement on the State of the Global Climate based on data provided by National Meteorological and Hydrological Services and other national and international organizations.
“Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That
Shapes What We See, Think, and Do”


As avowed neo-Nazi James Alex Fields pleaded guilty Wednesday to 29 counts of hate crimes in a federal court for plowing his car into a crowd of anti-racist protesters in Charlottesville in August of 2017, Democracy Now takes a look at a new book that addresses the tragic event, as well as the rising number of race-based mass shootings, hate crimes and police shootings of unarmed men in the past several years.
How We Fight White Supremacy: A Field Guide to Black Resistance
by Akiba Solomon and Kenrya Rankin

This celebration of Black resistance, from protests to art to sermons to joy, offers a blueprint for the fight for freedom and justice — and
ideas for how each of us can contribute.

"As a baby, you knew nothing of the definitions the world was going to press onto you later in life—black, female, Southern. The world had not yet told you who you were, who you could or should be. You just were."

The Progressive

Why our neighbor to the north is so good to its workers, and what labor in the United States can do.

The Progressive

The Urban Institute and the Youth First Initiative want to help America move away from youth incarceration in favor of community-based solutions.

ColorLines

Book Review
Mann, M. (2016). The Madhouse Effect. New York: Columbia University Press.
 
This book is a little dated, but I wanted to highlight it this month as it is a good “everyday” resource for folks trying to understand, and then explain to others, the realities of climate change. Dr. Michael E. Mann is a professor at Pennsylvania State University and one of our society’s leading climate scientists. He has been heavily targeted by climate deniers from everyday folks to corporate executives to members of Congress, and yet has not yielded in his work to shift this nation’s conversation about climate. His credentials speak for themselves and I encourage you to explore his many writings. Dr. Mann is joined in this book by Tom Tolles, the renowned cartoonist from the Washington Post. Together they have created an accessible resource for those tackling climate issues. If you are familiar with this content, then this book might not be for you, but it would be a good buy for your “Uncle Al” who does not know climate change exists.
 
Mann and Tolles begin the book where I often begin my training sessions on this content: the science. This is not because “science will convince folks”, since we have ample research to show that for those denying climate change “the science” actually does not change their mind. But, for those who are not tuned into the science, know that this deal is happening, and want to understand the basic science of it, the first three chapters about climate science, climate change, and the impacts of the changes are perfect. Spoiler alert: The current situation is not good.
 
In the next three chapters Tolles and Mann take on deniers by exploring “stages of denial” and other elements of climate denial. It would be easy to write off climate deniers as “flat earthers” but in fact I know some very good folks who are deeply ignorant of this climate reality; not because they are ignorant, but because of their deeper connections to their race, class and / or gender privilege. One White woman I know is fairly comfortable in her life: she owns two homes - one in the north for summer and one in the desert to avoid the tough MN winters.  She is also an avid shopper, loves to maintain her comfort, and part of her “language of love” for her grandchildren is tied to consumption and gifts. She loves her grandchildren deeply and yet takes no action whatsoever to do anything different. She was a very late Baby-Boomer and for her the signs of a good life, of success and of what it means to enjoy one’s retirement are inextricably linked to an unsustainable level of consumerism. Is she awful? No, she’s quite loving actually. By most accounts she would fully embody what it means to be “an American” – blonde, blue eyes, white, well resourced, politically ranging from conservative to neutral, a little oblivious to levels of social complication, and very, very nice. I do not share this as a snipe at her, I share it because she is like millions of U.S.ers who have their faces up against the glass of their lives and simply cannot see their interdependence and environmental connections to the larger world. I also do not say this from “on high” as I too get swept up in my life and lose sight of the climate reality and what I need to change. For her, and for myself at times, this book is a vital tool because it is both accessible and complicated. It shares the basics and helps the reader cut through the distractions of the deniers.
 
The final two chapters help the reader understand where we can go from here by thankfully debunking the “solutions” that will make it worse, like geoengineering, and instead identify “a path forward” that allows for some form of movement. The danger of telling the entire truth of our current climate reality is that a reader may fall into solipsism and be unable to act in effective and urgent ways. Mann and Tolles avoid this by walking the fine line between telling it like it is and maintaining a sense of hope for change. Thus, if you are looking for a primer on climate change and how to talk about it with others, this is an excellent resource.
 
As I read this book, I also happened to be watching the series One Strange Rock (2018, National Geographic) on Netflix. It is narrated by Will Smith, with detailed commentary by eight NASA astronauts, and recounts some of the most existential and compelling aspects of this planet and our small lives on it. I am fortunate to have watched this show as I was reading the book in that it literally and figuratively kept me connected to this incredible biosphere and its profound existence as I was trying to take in the fact that we are consciously destroying it. I felt grief at times, yes, but the overwhelming beauty of this planet as revealed by the incredible cinematography and brilliant narration kept me out of despair and ready to do more for it. Through the lens of social justice and climate justice this show both succeeds and fails. It does not at all go into enough commentary / critique about climate change and the anthropomorphic causes, while at the same time it has a racially and gender complex set of astronauts sharing intimate and inspiring understandings of this small blue dot. If you choose to read the book, watch the show alongside it.
 
A final resource are two videos of Greta Thunberg, a 16-year old Swedish woman who has ignited a youth climate movement. The first video is her talk at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland (January, 2019). Certainly youth have been mobilizing for climate action before Greta, as I am sure she herself would acknowledge, but her “strike” has set a different tone of urgency, honesty and deep critique of the “leadership” of adults around the world. The second talk is her TED talk from August, 2018. Greta is on the spectrum and one of her traits from that is her ability to be quite frank without too much concern about “offending” anyone. And, if there was ever a time for someone to be that blunt and that unapologetic about it, it is now. I mention that she is on the spectrum not to “exceptionalize” her, but to address the ableism that nondisabled people often have about who can speak, lead, act around social justice issues and who cannot. Greta does not want to be a “future leader”, she wants those in power to lead NOW since they are there RIGHT NOW. She wants those imbued with social responsibility to act like it and stop this true insanity.
 
I share these three resources because we have a president who is doing everything he can to dismantle what little climate policy the U.S. had and replace it with national and global policy that is without question a death sentence for humans and many other species on our planet. This current administration is like a three-pack-a-day smoker who is sure the science is wrong, who attributes his hacking to a cold he has had for a while, who hates anyone telling him they do not want to breathe his second hand smoke, who insists it’s his body dammit and he’ll do whatever he feels like with it, who could care less about the massive tax cuts the tobacco industry gets while knowingly lying to all of us, and who is surely stealing from the health care coffers of future generations to expensively treat his stage four lung cancer. It is intentional denial and willful ignorance only to protect his own comfort and placate his self-centeredness…and I have no patience for folks like that, particularly when the consequences with this issue are nothing short of global catastrophe for centuries to come.
 
And so, for this newsletter I have offered a book, a video series, and a voice of leadership for us to digest and then act on. I ask that you take them in and then weave this climate content into every conversation you have. Seems daunting, but there is not a single aspect of our lives that is not touched by climate change and its consequences. Center it. Make it part of everything we think, see and do. As Greta says, our house is on fire and thus we need to respond with all four alarms and every resource we have.
Blog Update
Want to get notified about HCG blog posts as soon as they go live? All you have to do is follow HCG on Google+, Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn (see those handy buttons at the top of the newsletter? Click there!) and you'll be notified each time we post a new blog. Or, better yet, get new blog posts delivered directly to your inbox by subscribing to the RSS feed through the button below.
HCG Blog Button and RSS Subscription
Share
Tweet
Forward
Copyright © *|2016|* *|Hackman Consulting Group|*, All rights reserved.


Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp