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Stein Nutrition Newsletter, June 2014
June 2014

Welcome

Welcome to the Stein Nutrition Newsletter! I hope you will find the information useful. For more information, please visit our website at http://nutrition.ansci.illinois.edu.

Research report: Effect of phytase, fiber, and fat on calculated values for apparent and standardized total tract digestibility of calcium in fish meal

The presence of phytate in swine diets reduces the digestibility of calcium because phytate is able to bind calcium from organic sources and some inorganic sources, making it inaccessible to the pig. Microbial phytase breaks down phytate and increases the availability of calcium. An experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that inclusion of microbial phytase increases the apparent (ATTD) and standardized (STTD) total tract digestibility of calcium in fish meal in diets containing phytate from corn and corn germ.

Besides phytate, corn and corn germ also add fiber and fat to diets, so it is important to know how fiber and fat affect calcium digestibility. Therefore, a second experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that the values of ATTD and STTD of calcium obtained from cornstarch and corn based diets may differ, and to determine the effect of dietary fiber and fat on the ATTD and STTD of calcium in fish meal.

(Read more ...)

Podcast: Reducing the percentage of cropland devoted to production of corn ethanol

Dr. Stein appeared on the AgriTalk program on June 10 to talk about a study of land usage attributed to corn ethanol production in the United States. Audio courtesy of AgriTalk, powered by Farm Journal.

(Listen or download)

Press release: Study on energy digestibility in cereal grains could help different populations meet their nutritional needs

URBANA – Cereal grains are a staple of human diets all over the world. However, cereal grains do not all make the same contributions to the diet. Grains differ in the concentrations of fiber and resistant starch they contain, resulting in different digestibility values for energy and nutrients. People in developed countries are often trying to limit their caloric intake, while people in other parts of the world need to increase theirs. Researchers at the University of Illinois are using nutritional studies in pigs to determine which cereal grains are best suited to different nutritional needs.

"Determining energy and nutrient digestibility in humans is difficult and expensive," said Hans H. Stein, professor of animal sciences at Illinois. "Fortunately, the growing pig is a good model for humans."

(Read more ...)

In This Issue

• Research report: Effect of phytase, fiber, and fat on calculated values for apparent and standardized total tract digestibility of calcium in fish meal
• Podcast: Reducing the percentage of cropland devoted to production of corn ethanol
• Press release: Study on energy digestibility in cereal grains could help different populations meet their nutritional needs

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