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Stein Nutrition Newsletter, April 2013
April 2013

Welcome

Welcome to the Stein Nutrition Newsletter! I hope you will find the information useful. For more information, please visit our website at http://nutrition.ansci.illinois.edu.

Research Report: Effect on growth performance and carcass characteristics of reducing the particle size of corn fed to growing pigs

Grinding feedstuffs increases their energy and nutrient digestibility, because the reduced particle size provides more surface area for digestive enzymes and microbes to act on. Currently, nutritionists recommend feeding corn ground to an average particle size of 650 to 700 µm. However, research has shown that corn ground to smaller particle sizes contains more metabolizable energy than corn ground to larger particle sizes, which leads to greater feed efficiency.

An experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that diets containing corn ground to  reduced particle size can be formulated with less fat than diets containing corn ground to a greater particle size without compromising growth performance or carcass characteristics.

(Read more...)

Podcast: Energy and amino acid digestibility in animal protein sources fed to weanling pigs

Oscar Rojas is a Ph.D. candidate in the Stein Monogastric Nutrition Lab. He discusses the results of two experiments to determine the concentration of digestible and metabolizable energy and the digestibility of amino acids in chicken meal, poultry by-product meal, Ultrapro, AV-E Digest, and conventional soybean meal fed to weanling pigs. Adapted from a presentation at the 2013 ASAS Midwestern Section meeting, Des Moines, IA, March 11-13.

(Listen or download)

Press release: Calculating phosphorus and calcium concentrations in meat and bone meal for pig diets

URBANA – Following the drought of 2012, the prices of corn and soybean meal for livestock diets have increased significantly. In an effort to reduce their costs, pork producers are looking for alternative sources of calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P). Researchers at the University of Illinois have developed equations for calculating the concentrations of these minerals in byproducts from the rendering industry.

Professor of animal sciences Hans H. Stein and his team determined the digestibility of Ca and P in meat and bone meal (MBM), which is traditionally used as a source of protein in animal diets. MBM contains greater concentrations of Ca and P than all plant feed ingredients, so it can replace inorganic phosphates in swine diets without harming the bones or negatively affecting growth of the animals.

However, to use MBM effectively as a source of P and Ca, producers need an accurate assessment of the digestibility of these minerals when fed to pigs.

(Read more...)

Press release: Establishing the nutritional value of copra and palm kernel products fed to pigs

URBANA – Products derived from coconuts and oil palm trees are the primary protein sources in swine diets in parts of Africa, southeast Asia, South America, and Europe. New research at the University of Illinois is helping to establish the nutritional value of these products.

Copra meal is produced when coconut oil is removed by solvent extraction from the meat of the coconut. Similarly, palm kernel meal is produced by solvent extraction of oil from oil palm seeds. When palm oil is instead removed by crushing, the resulting product is called palm kernel expellers.

"In many countries in the world, and particularly in the tropics, copra and palm kernel products are the main protein sources for livestock. You also see palm kernel products and copra products fed throughout Latin America and many places in Europe," said Hans H. Stein, professor of animal sciences at the University of Illinois. "And there are no recent values on energy and amino acid digestibility, so we wanted to get those established."

(Read more...)

New publications

Sulabo, R. C. and H. H. Stein. 2013. Digestibility of phosphorus and calcium in meat and bone meal fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 91:1285-1294.

Sulabo, R. C., Ju, W. S., and H. H. Stein. 2013. Amino acid digestibility and concentration of digestible and metabolizable energy in copra meal, palm kernel expellers, and palm kernel meal fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 91:1391-1399.

Almeida, F. N., J. K. Htoo, J. Thomson, and H. H. Stein. 2013. Comparative amino acid digestibility in US blood products fed to weanling pigs. Anim. Feed Sci. Technol.181:80-86.

Jaworski, N. W., H. N. Lærke, K. E. Bach Knudsen, and H. H. Stein. 2013. Carbohydrate composition and in vitro digestibility of dry matter and non-starch polysaccharides in grains and grain co-products. J. Anim. Sci. 91(Suppl. 2):23 (Abstr.)

Song, M., J. K. Mathai, F. N. Almeida, O. J. Rojas, S. L. Tilton, M. J. Cecava, and H. H. Stein. 2013. Energy concentration and amino acid digestibility in corn and corn co-products fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 91(Suppl. 2):23-24 (Abstr.)

Rojas, O. J. and H. H. Stein. 2013. Concentration of metabolizable energy and digestibility of amino acids in chicken meal, poultry by-product meal, Ultrapro, AV-E Digest, and conventional soybean meal fed to pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 91(Suppl. 2):26 (Abstr.)

Maison, T. and H. H. Stein. 2013. Amino acid digestibility in canola meal, 00-rapeseed meal, and 00-rapeseed expellers fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 91(Suppl. 2):27 (Abstr.)

Almeida, F. N., J. K. Htoo, J. Thomson, and H. H. Stein. 2013. Effects of heat damage on the nutritional composition and on the amino acid digestibility of canola meal, sunflower meal, and cottonseed meal fed to pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 91(Suppl. 2):27 (Abstr.)

González-Vega, J. C., C. L. Walk, and H. H. Stein. 2013. The site of absorption of calcium from the intestinal tract of growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 91(Suppl. 2):74 (Abstr.)

Curry, S., Navarro, D., Almeida, F., and H. Stein. 2013. Amino acid digestibility by growing pigs in distillers dried grains with solubles with conventional, medium, or low concentrations of fat. J. Anim. Sci. 91(Suppl. 2):102-103 (Abstr.)

Sotak, K., M. Song, H. Stein, and S. Moreland. 2013. Disappearance of butyrate in the digestive tract of weanling and growing pigs fed diets containing different sources of butyrate. J. Anim. Sci. 91(Suppl. 2):110 (Abstr.)

Almeida, F. N., J. K. Htoo, J. Thomson, and H. H. Stein. 2013. Amino acid digestibility in heat damaged distillers dried grains with solubles fed to pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 91(Suppl. 2):110 (Abstr.)

Rojas Martinez, O. J. and H. H. Stein. 2013. Inclusion of fermented soybean meal, chicken meal, or poultry by-product meal in phase 1, phase 2, and phase 3 diets fed to weanling pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 91(Suppl. 2):115 (Abstr.)

Rodríguez, D. A., R. C. Sulabo, J. C. González-Vega, and H. H. Stein. 2013. Energy concentration and phosphorus digestibility in canola, cottonseed, and sunflower products fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 91(Suppl. 2):116-117 (Abstr.)

Jaworski, N. W., A. Owusu-Asiedu, D. Petri, and H. H. Stein. 2013. Effect of rate of daily gain on nutrient and energy digestibility in growing-finishing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 91(Suppl. 2):117 (Abstr.)

Lowell, J. E., M. Song, J. K. Mathai, and H. H. Stein. 2013. Effects of including microbial phytase in diets fed to pigs and broilers. J. Anim. Sci. 91(Suppl. 2):121 (Abstr.)

Rojas, O. J. and H. H. Stein. 2013. Phosphorus digestibility and concentration of digestible and metabolizable energy in corn, corn co-products, and bakery meal fed to pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 91(Suppl. 2):122 (Abstr.)

In This Issue

• Research Report: Effect on growth performance and carcass characteristics of reducing the particle size of corn fed to growing pigs
• Podcast: Energy and amino acid digestibility in animal protein sources fed to weanling pigs
• Press release: Calculating phosphorus and calcium concentrations in meat and bone meal for pig diets
• Press release: Establishing the nutritional value of copra and palm kernel products fed to pigs
• New publications from the Stein Monogastric Nutrition Laboratory

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