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Stein Nutrition Newsletter, May 2013
May 2013

Welcome

Welcome to the Stein Nutrition Newsletter! I hope you will find the information useful. For more information, please visit our website at http://nutrition.ansci.illinois.edu.

Research Report: Effects of heat treatment on the composition and amino acid digestibility of canola meal fed to growing pigs

Canola meal is the second most used plant protein source, after soybean meal, in livestock diets. The production of canola meal involves a step in which the meal is treated with steam for 35 to 50 minutes at temperatures from 95 to 115°C. The application of heat and moisture to feedstuffs results in the Maillard reaction, which reduces the concentration and digestibility of amino acids. Lysine is particularly susceptible to the Maillard reaction, so it is important to determine accurate digestible lysine levels in feedstuffs that may be heat damaged. Amino acid analysis that does not account for lysine recovered from acid hydrolysis of Maillard products may overestimate the amount of digestible lysine in a sample. Therefore, methods other than simple lysine analysis must be used when assessing feed that may be heat damaged.

An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of heat damage on the digestibility of crude protein and amino acids in canola meal fed to growing pigs. Another objective of the experiment was to develop regression equations to predict the concentration of standardized ileal digestible (SID) amino acids in canola meal.

(Read more...)

Research report: Effects of different corn particle sizes on growth performance for weanling pigs

The metabolizable energy content of corn ground to smaller particle sizes is greater than that of corn ground to larger particle sizes, because the reduced particle size provides more surface area for digestive enzymes to act on. This results in more starch being digested in the small intestine with a subsequent absorption of glucose.

Currently, nutritionists recommend feeding corn ground to an average particle size of 650 to 700 µm. However, it may be advisable to formulate diets containing corn ground to smaller particle sizes due to the greater ME in these diets. If diets are formulated to a constant ME, the inclusion of added fat can be reduced if corn ground to a smaller particle size is used.

In a previous experiment, growth performance did not differ among growing-finishing pigs (average initial body weight: 32 kg) fed diets containing corn ground to particle sizes ranging from 339 to 865 µm if diets were formulated to the same ME by reducing the concentration of added fat as corn particle size was reduced. The experiment discussed in this report was conducted to test the hypothesis that added fat can be reduced in diets fed to weanling pigs if corn ground to a smaller particle size is used.

(Read more...)

Podcast: Energy concentration and amino acid digestibility in corn and corn co-products fed to growing pigs

John Mathai, master's student in the Stein Monogastric Nutrition Lab, presents his research on energy concentration and amino acid digestibility in corn and corn co-products from the wet milling industry. The co-products investigated were corn bran, high fat corn germ, liquid corn extractives, and a mixture of corn germ meal and liquid corn extractives. Adapted from a presentation at the 2013 ASAS Midwestern Section meeting, Des Moines, IA, March 11-13.

(Listen or download)

Press release: New bacterial phytase is highly effective at increasing phosphorus digestibility in pigs

URBANA – Phosphorus is a vital nutrient for pig growth, but the majority of the phosphorus in common plant-based feedstuffs is bound to phytate and therefore unavailable to pigs. Diets fed to pigs can be supplemented with microbial phytase to improve phosphorus digestibility.

Researchers at the University of Illinois have published results showing that a new phytase derived from the bacterium Aspergillus oryzae is highly effective at releasing phosphorus from the phytate molecule.

(Read more...)

New publications from the Stein Monogastric Nutrition Laboratory

Lee, J. W., D. Y. Kil, B. D. Keever, J. Killefer, F. K. McKeith, R. C. Sulabo, and H. H. Stein. 2013. Carcass fat quality of pigs is not improved by adding corn germ, beef tallow, palm kernel oil, or glycerol to finishing diets containing distillers dried grains with solubles. J. Anim. Sci. 91:2426-2437.

Stewart, L. L., D. Y. Kil, F. Ji, R. B. Hinson, A. D. Beaulieu, G. L. Allee, J. F. Patience, J. E. Pettigrew, and H. H. Stein. 2013. Effects of dietary soybean hulls and wheat middlings on body composition, nutrient and energy retention, and the net energy of diets and ingredients fed to growing and finishing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 91:2756-2765.

Sulabo, R. C., J. K. Mathai, J. L. Usry, B. W. Ratliff, D. M. McKilligan, J. D. Moline, G. Xu, and H. H. Stein. 2013. Nutritional value of dried fermentation biomass, hydrolyzed porcine intestinal mucosa products, and fish meal fed to weanling pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 91:2802-2811.

In This Issue

• Research Report: Effects of heat treatment on the composition and amino acid digestibility of canola meal fed to growing pigs
• Research Report: Effects of different corn particle sizes on growth performance for weanling pigs
• Podcast: Energy concentration and amino acid digestibility in corn and corn co-products fed to growing pigs
• Press release: New bacterial phytase is highly effective at increasing phosphorus digestibility in pigs
• New publications from the Stein Monogastric Nutrition Laboratory

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