Copy
Stein Nutrition Newsletter, December 2012
March 2013

Welcome

Welcome to the Stein Nutrition Newsletter! I hope you will enjoy the new look and find the information useful. For more information, please visit our website at http://nutrition.ansci.illinois.edu.

Research Report: Amino acid digestibility in heat damaged sunflower meal and cottonseed meal fed to growing pigs

Sunflower meal and cottonseed meal are alternative protein sources for swine diets. The production of both involves heat treatment, to extract oil from sunflower seeds and cottonseeds and to reduce antinutritional factors. When heat is applied to feed ingredients in the presence of moisture, a series of chemical reactions known as the Maillard reaction may be initiated.  In the Maillard reaction, amino acids and reducing sugars combine to form indigestible compounds known as Amadori compounds. These amino acids are therefore not available to the pigs. Lysine is particularly susceptible to the Maillard reaction. It is important to know the extent of heat damage in feed ingredients so that diets may be formulated that supply the appropriate amounts of digestible amino acids to pigs.

Little information is available about the effects of heat processing on amino acid digestibility in sunflower meal and cottonseed meal. Furthermore, equations to predict the concentration of digestible amino acids in sunflower meal and cottonseed meal from the analyzed nutrient composition have not been reported. Two experiments were conducted to determine the standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of amino acids in sunflower meal and in cottonseed meal fed to growing pigs, and to test if regression equations could be developed to predict the concentration of SID lysine in sunflower meal and cottonseed meal.

(Read more...)

Podcast: The site of absorption of calcium from the intestinal tract of growing pigs

Caroline González-Vega is a Ph.D. candidate in the Stein Monogastric Nutrition Lab. She describes an experiment to determine the effect of the level of calcium and the level of phytate in the digestibility of calcium in inorganic (calcium carbonate) and organic (Vistacal) calcium sources, and the site in the gastrointestinal tract where calcium is absorbed for the two sources. Adapted from a presentation at the 2013 ASAS Midwestern Section meeting, Des Moines, IA, March 11-13.

(Listen or download)

Press release: Feeding corn germ to pigs does not affect growth performance

URBANA - Inclusion of corn germ in swine diets can reduce diet costs, depending on the local cost of corn germ and other ingredients. Recent research conducted at the University of Illinois indicates that corn germ can be included at up to 30 percent in diets fed to growing pigs.

"In previous research we had seen that pigs do very well on diets containing 10 percent corn germ, so we wanted to investigate if higher inclusion rates can be used," said Hans Stein, professor of animal sciences at Illinois.

(Read more...)

New publications

Kim, B. G., D. Y. Kil, and H. H. Stein. 2013. In growing pigs, the true ileal and total tract digestibility of acid hydrolyzed ether extract in extracted corn oil is greater than in intact sources of corn oil or soybean oil. J. Anim. Sci. 91:755-763.

Almeida, F. N., R. C. Sulabo, and H. H. Stein. 2013. Effects of a novel bacterial phytase expressed in Aspergillus oryzae on digestibility of calcium and phosphorus in diets fed to weanling or growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. Biotechnol. 4:8.

In This Issue

• Research Report: Amino acid digestibility in heat damaged sunflower meal and cottonseed meal fed to growing pigs
• Podcast: The site of absorption of calcium from the intestinal tract of growing pigs
• Press release: Feeding corn germ to pigs does not affect growth performance
• New publications from the Stein Monogastric Nutrition Laboratory

Keep Up With Us

Friend on Facebook Facebook
Follow on Twitter Twitter
Copyright © 2013 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, All rights reserved.
unsubscribe from this list | update subscription preferences