Copy
Stein Nutrition Newsletter, July 2014
July 2014

Welcome

Welcome to the Stein Nutrition Newsletter! I hope you will find the information useful. For more information, please visit our website at http://nutrition.ansci.illinois.edu.

Research report: Digestibility of energy and concentrations of digestible and metabolizable energy in processed soybean and rapeseed products fed to growing pigs

Soybean meal is the most common source of protein in swine diets in the United States. However, conventional soybean meal contains antinutritional factors such as antigenic proteins, oligosaccharides, lectins, and trypsin inhibitors that limit its use in diets fed to weanling pigs. Methods of processing soybean meal to remove antinutritional factors have been developed. These include enzyme treatment, fermentation, and the removal of soluble carbohydrates.

Like soybean meal, rapeseed products are usually not fed to weanling pigs due to the presence of glucosinolates and relatively high concentrations of fiber in these products. Previous research has shown that fermentation of soybean meal can reduce antinutritional factors and fiber concentrations. An experiment was conducted to determine the apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of energy and concentrations of digestible (DE) and metabolizable (ME) energy in four sources of processed soybean products, conventional soybean meal, conventional 00-rapeseed expellers, and in a fermented mixture of co-products including 00-rapeseed expellers, wheat bran, potato peel, and soy molasses.

(Read more ...)

Research Report: Estimation of the requirement for standardized ileal digestible lysine in 25 to 50 kg gilts

Lysine is the first limiting amino acid in swine diets based on corn and soybean meal. Lysine requirements for pigs are affected by growth rate and lean deposition rate, which in turn are affected by sex, genetics, age, and other factors. An experiment was conducted to determine the requirement for standardized ileal digestible (SID) lysine in 25 to 50 kg growing gilts.

(Read more ...)

Podcast: Amino acid digestibility in processed soybean and rapeseed products fed to weanling pigs

Ph. D. candidate Diego Navarro presents the results of a study investigating amino acid digestibility in enzyme-treated soybean meal, enzyme-treated extruded soybean meal, soy protein concentrate, conventional soybean meal, conventional 00-rapeseed expellers, and a fermented co-product mixture containing fermented 00-rapeseed meal, wheat bran, soy molasses, and potato peel. Adapted from a presentation at the 2014 ASDA-ASAS-CSAS Joint Annual Meeting, Kansas City, Missouri, July 20-24.

(Listen or download)

Podcast: Comparative digestibility of energy and nutrients in diets fed to sows and growing pigs

Jessica Lowell is a recent Master's degree recipient from the Stein Nutrition Lab. In this podcast, she discusses her research on the comparative digestibility of crude protein, NDF, and energy in diets fed to gestating sows and growing pigs. Adapted from a presentation at the 2014 ASDA-ASAS-CSAS Joint Annual Meeting, Kansas City, Missouri, July 20-24.

(Listen or download)

Press release: Evaluating low-fat distillers dried grains with solubles for use in swine diets

URBANA, Ill. – Distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) are a co-product of the ethanol industry and have been an affordable source of energy and protein in swine diets for decades. In recent years, ethanol plants have begun to centrifuge the solubles from ethanol production to extract oil, which is sold to the biodiesel industry. As a result, new low-fat DDGS products are available for swine diets. Researchers at the University of Illinois are evaluating these products for use in swine diets.

"Dietary fat concentration has been shown to be a factor in the digestibility of nutrients," said Hans Stein, a professor of animal sciences at U of I. "Because DDGS supplies a significant amount of protein in swine diets, we wanted to investigate if amino acid digestibility is compromised in diets containing low-fat DDGS."

(Read more ...)

New publications from the Stein Monogastric Nutrition Laboratory

Liu, Y., Y. L. Ma, J. M. Zhao, M. Vazquez-Añón, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Digestibility and retention of zinc, copper, manganese, iron, calcium, and phosphorus in pigs fed diets containing inorganic or organic minerals. J. Anim. Sci. 92:3407-3415.

Maison, T. and H. H. Stein. 2014. Digestibility by growing pigs of amino acids in canola meal from North America and 00-rapeseed meal and 00-rapeseed expellers from Europe. J. Anim. Sci. 92:3502-3514.

Mathai, J. K. and H. H. Stein. 2014. Estimated lysine requirement of 25 to 50 kg growing gilts. J. Anim. Sci 92(E-Suppl. 2):218-219 (Abstr.)

Jaworski, N. W., Y. Liu, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Energy concentration and amino acid digestibility in two sources of canola meal fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci 92(E-Suppl. 2):220 (Abstr.)

Navarro, D. M. D. L., Y. Liu, T. S. Bruun, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Amino acid digestibility in processed soybean products and rapeseed products fed to weanling pigs. J. Anim. Sci 92(E-Suppl. 2):221 (Abstr.)

Jaworski, N. W., D. Liu, D. Li, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Digestible, metabolizable, and net energy in diets containing 0, 15, or 30% wheat bran fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci 92(E-Suppl. 2):224 (Abstr.)

Liu, Y., T. Maison, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Performance of pigs fed diets containing canola meal produced from high protein or conventional varieties of canola seeds. J. Anim. Sci 92(E-Suppl. 2):225-6 (Abstr.)

Lowell, J. E., Y. Liu, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Comparative digestibility of energy and nutrients in feed ingredients fed to sows and growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci 92(E-Suppl. 2):226 (Abstr.)

González-Vega, J. C., C. L. Walk, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Effect of fiber and fat on calculated values for standardized total tract digestibility of calcium in fish meal. J. Anim. Sci 92(E-Suppl. 2):231-232 (Abstr.)

Wealleans, A. L., Y. Dersjant-Li, R. M. Bold, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Effect of a 6-phytase derived from Buttiauxella spp. expressed in Trichoderma reesei on apparent total tract digestibility of Ca and P, bone ash, and growth performance in weaning piglets. J. Anim. Sci 92(E-Suppl. 2):237 (Abstr.)

Stein, H. H. 2014. Procedures and methodology for determining standard ileal digestibility (SID) amino acid digestibility of feedstuffs. J. Anim. Sci 92(E-Suppl. 2):377 (Abstr.)

Parr, C. K., Y. Liu, C. M. Parsons, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Phosphorus digestibility in high protein canola meals, conventional canola meal, and soybean meal fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci 92(E-Suppl. 2):641 (Abstr.)

Curry, S. M., J. K. Htoo, H. V. Masey O'Neill, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Digestibility of amino acids in distillers dried grains with solubles produced in Europe from wheat, maize, or mixtures of wheat and maize and fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci 92(E-Suppl. 2):643 (Abstr.)

Mathai, J. K. and H. H. Stein. 2014. Amino acid digestibility in field peas, fish meal, corn, soybean meal, and soybean hulls. J. Anim. Sci 92(E-Suppl. 2):648 (Abstr.)

Liu, Y., R. C. Sulabo, T. E. Sauber, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Different corn hybrids fed to growing pigs. I. Chemical composition, energy concentration, and digestibility of nutrients. J. Anim. Sci 92(E-Suppl. 2):667 (Abstr.)

Liu, Y., R. C. Sulabo, T. E. Sauber, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Different corn hybrids fed to growing pigs. II. Concentrations and digestibility of amino acids. J. Anim. Sci 92(E-Suppl. 2):668 (Abstr.)

In This Issue

• Research report: Digestibility of energy and concentrations of digestible and metabolizable energy in processed soybean and rapeseed products fed to growing pigs
• Research report: Estimation of the requirement for standardized ileal digestible lysine in 25 to 50 kg gilts
• Podcast: Amino acid digestibility in processed soybean and rapeseed products fed to weanling pigs
• Podcast: Comparative digestibility of energy and nutrients in diets fed to sows and growing pigs
• Press release: Evaluating low-fat distillers dried grains with solubles for use in swine diets
• New publications from the Stein Monogastric Nutrition Laboratory

Keep Up With Us

Friend on Facebook Facebook
Follow on Twitter Twitter
Copyright © 2014 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, All rights reserved.
unsubscribe from this list | update subscription preferences