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Stein Nutrition Newsletter, September 2014
September 2014

Welcome

Welcome to the Stein Nutrition Newsletter! In this issue, you will find some of the work our lab has produced in the previous month. For more information, please visit our website at http://nutrition.ansci.illinois.edu.

Research Report: Amino acid digestibility in rice co-products fed to growing pigs

Global production of rice is third in terms of total tonnage after corn and wheat. Rice is grown to produce polished white rice for human consumption. However, harvested rice, called paddy rice or rough rice, needs to be dehulled, which results in production of brown rice. The outer brown bran layer of brown rice, known as rice bran, also needs to be removed before polished white rice is produced. Approximately 20% of the paddy rice is hulls and the bran fraction is 8 to 10%, so only 70% of the paddy rice will become polished rice. Rice bran is high in fiber, and also contains about 15% crude protein and 14 to 20% fat. Rice bran can be fed as full fat rice bran or defatted rice bran. During milling of the rice, some kernels may get broken and cannot be used for human consumption. These broken kernels are known as broken rice or brewers rice and may also be used in animal feeding. Broken rice is high in starch and contains little fat, fiber, or protein.

Thus, both rice bran and broken rice may be fed to pigs, but these ingredients are poorly characterized in terms of nutritional value. An experiment was, therefore, conducted to determine the standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of crude protein and amino acids in broken rice, two sources of full fat rice bran (FFRB), and defatted rice bran (DFRB) fed to growing pigs.

(Read more ...)

Research report: Energy digestibility in 23 sources of distillers dried grains with solubles fed to pigs

Distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) is a co-product of the ethanol industry and is often used as an economical source of energy and protein in swine diets. Conventional DDGS contains approximately 27% crude protein, 10% fat, 9% acid detergent fiber (ADF), and 25% (NDF). The concentrations of digestible energy (DE) and metabolizable energy (ME) in conventional sources of DDGS are approximately 3,500 and 3,350 kcal/kg, respectively. However, there is significant variation in the way different plants produce DDGS. For example, in recent years ethanol plants have begun extracting oil from DDGS to sell to the biodiesel industry. This results in DDGS with its fat content reduced to approximately 6 to 9%, which may result in lower concentrations of DE and ME.

If pigs are fed diets containing decreased levels of DE and ME relative to conventional DDGS, a reduction in growth performance may result. This would make DDGS a less economical feedstuff. An experiment was conducted to determine the variability of DE and ME in DDGS produced in and around Illinois.

(Read more ...)

Podcast: Effect of fiber and fat on calculated values for standardized total tract digestibility of calcium in fish meal

Caroline González-Vega, Ph. D. candidate in the Stein Nutrition Lab, discusses the results of two experiments on the digestibility of calcium in fish meal. The studies used corn based diets as well as cornstarch-based (semisynthetic) diets, and the results have implications for the use of semisynthetic diets in digestibility studies. Adapted from a presentation at the 2014 ASDA-ASAS-CSAS Joint Annual Meeting, Kansas City, Missouri, July 20-24.

(Listen or download)

Press release: U of I, commodity councils hold educational workshop for Southeast Asia animal feed professionals

URBANA, Ill. – With a growing population and increasing wealth, Southeast Asia is experiencing a rapid rise in demand for meat. As a consequence, maximizing growth performance of food animals as economically as possible is a priority for Asian producers. Researchers from the University of Illinois, in collaboration with U.S. Soybean Export Council (USSEC) and U.S. Grains Council (USGC), recently completed a successful workshop to educate feed mill managers, nutritionists, and feed formulators in Southeast Asia on "The Basics of Nutrition to Maximize Animal Performance."

(Read more ...)

New publications from the Stein Monogastric Nutrition Laboratory

Almeida, F. N., J. K. Htoo, J. Thomson, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Effects of balancing crystalline amino acids in diets containing heat-damaged soybean meal or distillers dried grains with solubles fed to weanling pigs. Animal 8:1594-1602.

Liu, Y., M. Song, T. Maison, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Effects of protein concentration and heat treatment on concentration of digestible and metabolizable energy and on amino acid digestibility in four sources of canola meal fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 92:4466-4477.

Kim, B. G., D. Y. Kil, D. C. Mahan, G. M. Hill, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Effects of dietary sulfur and distillers dried grains with solubles on carcass characteristics, loin quality, and tissue concentrations of sulfur, selenium, and copper in growing–finishing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 92:4486-4493.

Almeida, F. N., R. C. Sulabo, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Amino acid digestibility and concentration of digestible and metabolizable energy in a threonine biomass product fed to weanling pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 92:4540-4546.

Liu, Y., M. Song, F. N. Almeida, S. L. Tilton, M. J. Cecava, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Energy concentration and amino acid digestibility in corn and corn coproducts from the wet-milling industry fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 92:4557-4565.

In This Issue

• Research report: Amino acid digestibility in rice co-products fed to growing pigs
• Research report: Energy digestibility in 23 sources of distillers dried grains with solubles fed to pigs
• Podcast: Effect of fiber and fat on calculated values for standardized total tract digestibility of calcium in fish meal
• Press release: U of I, commodity councils hold educational workshop for Southeast Asia animal feed professionals
• New publications from the Stein Monogastric Nutrition Laboratory

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