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Stein Nutrition Newsletter, February 2015
February 2015

Welcome

Welcome to the Stein Nutrition Newsletter! In this issue, you will find some of the work our lab has produced in the previous month. For more information, please visit our website at http://nutrition.ansci.illinois.edu.

Effects of xylanase on the concentration of digestible and metabolizable energy in rice co-products fed to weaning pigs

Several co-products from rice processing can be used as animal feed. Brown rice is the whole rice grain that is left after the hull layer has been removed, leaving the germ, starchy endosperm, and bran. Rice bran is the outer brown layer of brown rice, which is removed to produce white rice. It is high in fiber, and also contains about 15% crude protein and 14 to 20% fat. Rice bran can be fed as full fat rice bran or defatted rice bran. Broken rice, or brewer's rice, consists of white rice grains that have been damaged in processing. It is high in starch and contains little fat, fiber, or protein (Table 1).

Non–starch polysaccharides (NSPs), primarily arabinoxylan and cellulose, comprise 20 to 25% of defatted rice bran. NSPs reduce nutrient absorption and energy digestibility. Addition of exogenous xylanase to wheat co-products, which also have high concentration of NSPs, may improve digestibility of energy, but there is limited information about the effects of adding exogenous xylanases to rice co-products. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to determine the effect on  concentrations of digestible energy (DE) and metabolizable energy (ME) of adding exogenous xylanase to diets containing  full fat rice bran (FFRB), defatted rice bran (DFRB), brown rice, or broken rice.

(Read more ...)

Press release: Pigs can regulate sulfur retention when distillers dried grains are included in diet

URBANA, Ill. - Distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS), a co-product of the ethanol industry, is becoming a more common ingredient in swine diets. However, DDGS can be high in sulfur, and data are limited on the amount of sulfur that pigs can tolerate in the diet. Therefore, researchers at the University of Illinois have conducted research to investigate effects of high levels of sulfur in diets for pigs.

"The sulfur content of DDGS can range from approximately 0.3 to 0.9 percent," explained Hans H. Stein, professor of animal sciences at the U of I. "In a previous study, we determined that you can feed diets containing up to 0.38 percent sulfur without affecting palatability or pig growth performance. We wanted to follow up by determining whether or not the quality of the carcass was affected by the sulfur in the diets."

(Read more ...)

New publications from the Stein Monogastric Nutrition Laboratory

Maison, T., Y. Liu, and H. H. Stein. 2015. Digestibility of energy and detergent fiber and digestible and metabolizable energy values in canola meal, 00-rapeseed meal, and 00-rapeseed expellers fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 93:652-660.

Rojas, O. J. 2014. Effects of extrusion and pelleting on energy and nutrient digestibility in diets fed to pigs. Page 159 in XXX Curso de Especializacion FEDNA, Madrid, November 5-6, 2014. (Abstr.)

In This Issue

• Research report: Effects of xylanase on the concentration of digestible and metabolizable energy in rice co-products fed to weaning pigs
• Press release: Study: Pigs can regulate sulfur retention when distillers dried grains are included in diet
• New publications from the Stein Monogastric Nutrition Laboratory

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