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Stein Nutrition Newsletter, November 2014
November 2014

Welcome

Welcome to the Stein Nutrition Newsletter! In this issue, you will find some of the work our lab has produced in the previous month. For more information, please visit our website at http://nutrition.ansci.illinois.edu.

Stein Lab scholar wins award

Oscar Rojas, Ph. D. candidate in the Stein Monogastric Nutrition Laboratory at the University of Illinois, was recently selected as a recipient of a 2015 American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) Midwest Section Young Scholar Award. The Young Scholar Award recognizes and features the research accomplishments of recent Ph.D. graduates or current Ph.D. students in the advanced stages of their program at the annual Midwestern ADSA/ASAS meetings.

Research report: Effects of pelleting and extrusion on energy and nutrient digestibility in diets fed to pigs

Pelleting and extrusion are technologies that have been used in livestock feeding to improve nutrient digestibility and feed conversion. Recent research concluded that reduced performance of pigs fed diets containing high concentrations of fiber was ameliorated if the diets were pelleted. Extrusion is also of benefit in high fiber diets, because it may increase the solubility of dietary fiber. It is possible that the benefits of extrusion and pelleting are greater in high fiber diets than in low fiber diets, but this hypothesis has not been investigated. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to determine effects of extrusion and pelleting on energy and nutrient digestibility in diets containing low, medium, or high concentrations of fiber.
 
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Press release: New research on Ca provision in growing pigs

Research being carried out at the University of Illinois and funded by AB Vista will significantly improve the accuracy of calcium (Ca) provision in growing pigs by generating much-needed standardised or true total tract digestibility (STTD or TTTD) values for Ca across a range of common feed ingredients.

"The aim is to achieve the same level of precision for Ca when formulating diets as is possible for phosphorus (P)," states Dr Carrie Walk, AB Vista's Senior Research Manager. "We formulate using digestibility values for the majority of the important – and expensive – nutrients in the diet, such as P and amino acids, but that data is currently not available for Ca in growing pigs."

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Press release: Versatile aquatic plant provides fuel for people and food for pigs

URBANA, Ill. – Lemnaceae, commonly known as duckweed, is a small, free-floating aquatic plant with great potential for environmentally friendly applications. It can be used for the production of ethanol, biodiesel, and plastics. Research at the University of Illinois indicates that duckweed may also be a good protein source for swine diets.

"Duckweed yields more protein per acre than soybeans," said Dr. Hans H. Stein, professor of animal sciences at the University of Illinois. "It is easy to harvest, and because it grows in water it doesn't compete with food crops for land. This makes it a very exciting crop for a variety of uses, including animal feed."

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New publication from the Stein Monogastric Nutrition Laboratory

Kim, B. G, Y. Liu, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Energy concentration and phosphorus digestibility in yeast products produced from the ethanol industry, and in brewers’ yeast, fish meal, and soybean meal fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 92:5476-5484.

In This Issue

• Stein Lab scholar wins award
• Research report: Effects of pelleting and extrusion on energy and nutrient digestibility in diets fed to pigs
• Press release: New research on Ca provision in growing pigs
• Press release: Versatile aquatic plant provides fuel for people and food for pigs
• New publication from the Stein Monogastric Nutrition Laboratory

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