Copy
Stein Nutrition Newsletter, September 2015
September 2015

Welcome

Welcome to the Stein Nutrition Newsletter! In this issue, you will find some of the work our lab has produced in the previous month. For more information, please visit our website at http://nutrition.ansci.illinois.edu.

Research report: Digestibility of amino acids in a novel source of soy protein concentrate and in soybean meal fed to weanling pigs

Soybean meal is a high quality source of protein in diets fed to pigs. However, soybean meal contains anti-nutritional factors such as trypsin inhibitors and oligosaccharides, which decrease nutrient availability and limit the amount of soybean meal that can be fed in weanling pig diets.

Soy protein concentrate is produced by processing soybean meal to remove some nonprotein components, including the soluble carbohydrates. This leaves soy protein concentrate with a greater concentration of crude protein and amino acids than soybean meal. The presence of oligosaccharides in soybean meal has been shown to reduce the tolerance of young pigs to conventional soybean meal, and therefore, animal proteins rather than soybean meal is often used in diets for young pigs. However, if the oligosaccharides and other antinutritional factors can be removed from soybean meal, it is possible to use soybean meal in diets for young pigs instead of animal proteins.

Typically, an alcohol extraction process has been used to remove soluble carbohydrates from soybean meal to create soy protein concentrate. However, a new source of soy protein concentrate called Nutrivance (Midwest Ag Enterprises Inc., Marshall, MN) has recently been introduced. Nutrivance is produced using a process combining non-alcohol extraction and enzymatic treatment of soybean meal. The nutritional value of soy protein concentrate produced using this method has not been determined. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to determine the digestibility of amino acids in this new source of soy protein concentrate.

(Read more ...)

Podcast: Effects of pelleting and extrusion on energy digestibility in pig diets containing different levels of fiber

Dr. Oscar Rojas is a recent Ph. D. recipient from the Stein Nutrition Lab. In this podcast, he discusses the effects of pelleting, extrusion, or a combination of both technologies on digestibility of energy and nutrients in diets containing different levels of fiber fed to growing pigs. Adapted from a presentation at the 2015 ASDA-ASAS-CSAS Joint Annual Meeting, Orlando, Florida, July 12-16.

(Watch or download)

Press release: Study concludes that added enzyme makes phosphorus in rice co-products more digestible in pig diets

URBANA, Ill - Rice is the third most widely grown cereal grain worldwide with over 700 million tons produced per year. Co-products from the processing of rice for human consumption are an abundant feed source for livestock. Research conducted at the University of Illinois is helping producers make the most of these ingredients.

(Read more ...)

New publications from the Stein Monogastric Nutrition Laboratory

Boler, D. D., M. F. Overholt, J. E. Lowell, A. C. Dilger, and H. H. Stein. 2015. Effects of pelleting growing-finishing swine diets on growth, carcass, and bacon characteristics. Pages 23-30 in Proc. Midwest Swine Nutr. Conf. Indianapolis, IN, Sep. 10, 2015.

Jaworski, N. W. and H. H. Stein. 2015. Nonstarch polysaccharide composition influences the energy value of grains and co-products. Page 262 in Proceedings of the 66th Annual Meeting of the European Federation of Animal Science (EAAP), Warsaw, Poland, August 31-September 4, 2015.

In This Issue

• Research report: Digestibility of amino acids in a novel source of soy protein concentrate and in soybean meal fed to weanling pigs
• Podcast: Effects of pelleting and extrusion on energy digestibility in pig diets containing different levels of fiber
• Press release: Study concludes that added enzyme makes phosphorus in rice co-products more digestible in pig diets
• New publications from the Stein Monogastric Nutrition Laboratory

Keep Up With Us

Friend on Facebook Facebook
Follow on Twitter Twitter
Copyright © 2015 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, All rights reserved.
unsubscribe from this list | update subscription preferences