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Stein Nutrition Newsletter, October 2015
October 2015

Welcome

Welcome to the Stein Nutrition Newsletter! In this issue, you will find some of the work our lab has produced in the previous month. For more information, please visit our website at http://nutrition.ansci.illinois.edu.

Research report: Digestibility of phosphorus in a novel source of soy protein concentrate and in soybean meal fed to weanling pigs

Soy protein concentrate is produced by extracting some of the non-protein components of soybean meal, including soluble carbohydrates, from soybean meal. These soluble carbohydrates include oligosaccharides, which reduce the tolerance of young pigs to conventional soybean meal. With the oligosaccharides removed, soy protein concentrate can be used as a source of protein in diets for weanling pigs.

Most soy protein concentrate is produced using an alcohol extraction process. However, a new source of soy protein concentrate called Nutrivance (Midwest Ag Enterprises Inc., Marshall, MN) has recently been introduced, which uses a process combining non-alcohol extraction and enzymatic treatment of soybean meal. An experiment was conducted to determine the apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) and standardized total tract digestibility (STTD) of phosphorus in this new ingredient.

(Read more ...)

Podcast: Effect of a 3-strain Bacillus-based direct-fed microbial on performance, VFA production, carcass characteristics, and GI tract weights in growing-finishing pigs fed low or high fiber diets

Neil Jaworski, a Ph. D. student in the Stein Monogastric Nutrition Laboratory, presents his research on the use of a fiber-degrading feed additive in low fiber (corn-soybean meal) or high fiber (corn-soybean meal-DDGS-wheat middlings) diets fed to growing-finishing pigs. Jaworski studied the effects on growth performance, volatile fatty acid production, carcass characteristics, and gastrointestinal tract weights  Adapted from a presentation at the 2015 ASDA-ASAS-CSAS Joint Annual Meeting, Orlando, Florida, July 12-16.

(Watch or download)

Press release: Research at U of I aims to help swine producers feed the right amount of calcium

URBANA, Ill. – The majority of the calcium in swine diets is included in the form of supplements, because most plant ingredients are low in calcium. Formulating diets based on vales for total calcium fails to take into account how well the calcium in the diet is digested and absorbed from the intestinal tract, which makes it difficult to determine how much calcium is needed in the diets. However, recent research at the University of Illinois is adding to the industry's understanding of calcium digestibility.

Dr. Hans H. Stein, professor of animal sciences at Illinois, and his lab conducted an experiment to determine the effect of microbial phytase on the digestibility of calcium in a number of commonly used calcium supplements. In this way, they hoped to gain more data on exactly how much of a given supplement should be included in diets.

(Read more ...)

New publications from the Stein Monogastric Nutrition Laboratory

González-Vega, J. C., C. L. Walk, and H. H. Stein. 2015. Effect of phytate, microbial phytase, fiber, and soybean oil on calculated values for apparent and standardized total tract digestibility of calcium and apparent total tract digestibility of phosphorus in fish meal fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 93:4808-4818.

In This Issue

• Research report: Digestibility of phosphorus in a novel source of soy protein concentrate and in soybean meal fed to weanling pigs
• Podcast: Effect of a 3-strain Bacillus-based direct-fed microbial on performance, VFA production, carcass characteristics, and GI tract weights in growing-finishing pigs fed low or high fiber diets
• Press release: Research at U of I aims to help swine producers feed the right amount of calcium
• New publications from the Stein Monogastric Nutrition Laboratory

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