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Smalls/Mezzrow Newsletter - September 26th, 2016
Dear Friends:

Well, the 30th anniversary of my freshman year at then newly minted New School Jazz Program came and went with no fan-fare.  There was one exception - I was invited by Philp Ballman to come and address his class at the New School on the subject of "music business".  Phil's a great guy and teaches in a heartfelt way.  He also has some historical perspective on the New School jazz program and it's fundamental early days with Arnie Lawrence. For me, to come to the New School building that day and teach a class there, exactly 30 year after my first days as a dumb freshman, felt full circle.  The hall filled up with nearly all familiar faces.  Most every one of the students at the class were already cats that I knew from my nightly rounds at Smalls and Mezzrow.  In fact, Hillel Salem, a young Israeli trumpet player and New School student is already hosting a steady jam session at the club to great success.  I was happy to see my friends in the audience and so the class began.

Interview style, Phil asked me about being an "entrepreneur" and my thoughts on being a successful business man in jazz.  I had to disagree with him because I never thought of myself as either. I've always thought of myself as a piano player and a student of the music, from my first day at the New School in 1986 to this day.  I thought back to my New School college days of yore.   The mindset of my student peer  at that time was the same as mine.  We were obsessed with the drive for bebop knowledge and the will to become better and better musicians through serious practice.  The bar was set high and we were challenged.  For me, the choice of becoming a jazz musician was in the realm of taking a vow as a monk for religious life.  This included a vow of poverty and a true vow to do or die in approaching the study of jazz.  This attitude permeated our class in 1986 and, honestly, we never thought about "business" or even making that much money.  We were Bohemian.  We lived as cheaply as possible and in 1986 you could still live in a very dangerous (cheap) neighborhood such as Hell's Kitchen or the east-Village.  For me, I had set my mindset so hard to the challenge of really playing great that nearly everything else in my life slipped away.  In exchange for a normal life, I got month after month of sequestered practice and intensive late-night hang time at the clubs and jam sessions.  I reminded the students to take advantage of being young so that they could apply themselves assiduously to the practice of the music.  I advised them to live in the least expensive way so as to make as much time for practicing this music as they could.  I advised them not to think about "success" financially in regards to this sacred art.  That it takes so much intense effort and sacrifice ones time, at least 20 years, to really learn how to play.  There is no guarantee of financial reward - this was jazz.  You want to do it?  Then you got to really do it all in -and business is not going to be a part of it.

That all being said, I then reminded them that what's fun and possible when you're 26 isn't as cool when you're 36 or older.  It's just fact that as we age our needs change, it's undeniable.  Living with four guys in a one room apartment and staying up all night checking out Coltrane is great and necessary but eventually you'll need your own space.  It's not the fault of Jazz Music if you can no longer make a living by playing it.  Many artists after they reach this point begin to resent the music and become bitter, but it's not the fault of jazz - it's the fault of your own life's circumstance.  How can we rectify this negative state?  By recognizing Jazz as a sacred art and to return to the state of mind we started out with.  If one can make a living playing it and also retain their youthful and joyous spirit then they are indeed fortunate.  However, a person can also make a living with other work than music and still retain mastery and continued growth as an artist.  There does comes a point when the student life is no longer healthy and must be relinquished.  But one must still give the music the level of attention it deserves and needs.  Making a living is a reality.  I reiterated that there is no shame in working any kind of job that you may be good at.  The idea is to do something that is productive and positively effects those around you.  Good work enriches one's heart and therefore ones music.  

I expressed the enormous depth of gratitude that I feel for being in the current position that I am with the clubs.  I was asked if it were somehow a burden to me to run both clubs.  My answer is - I'm so honored to have this responsibility that I only want it to benefit everyone that comes in contact with it, the artists that play, the fans and our friends.  This is for everybody and the profits we seek are spiritual profits - in this case, SmallsLIVE rivals Exxon in earnings - our spiritual coffers runneth over.  It's anti-entrepreurship, it's a business for the sake of propagating our musical viewpoint.  Practice your music and be great.  Find your musical self-realization and become 100% of what you are - then you have reached genius level.  A genius is simply someone who is 100% themselves - that's our goal.  If you're good, the rest falls in place so naturally that it will take you by surprise!

Peace,

Spike
 
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New transcriptions and analysis weekly!

This week - Alex Sipiagin on "Expectation"
 
NOW: A cover paid at Mezzrow also gets you admission to Smalls.

Monday - 9/26
Fleurine with
Vitor Goncalves & Ian Faquini

Vocalist Fleurine has a wide range of repertoire from originals to Brazilian.  She also has a great feeling and lovely voice.  With her is pianist Vitor Goncalves and guitarist Ian Faquini.

Doors @ 7:30 PM
Fleurine sets @ 8 PM & 9:30 PM
John Merrill & Friends "After-hours" @ 11 PM

To advance purchase a reserved seat click:
CLICK HERE TO RESERVE

Tuesday - 9/27
Evan Christopher & Ehud Asherie

New Orleans based clarinettist Evan Christopher returns to Mezzrow with pianist Ehud Asherie for a joyful evening of song and swing.

Doors @ 7:30 PM
Evan Christopher sets @ 7:30 PM & 9:00 PM
Mezzrow "Polite Jam Session" @ 11 PM


To advance purchase a reserved seat click:
CLICK HERE TO RESERVE:

Wednesday - 9/28
Yotam Silberstein with
Vitor Goncalves & Maucha Adnet


Guitarist Yotam Silberstein comes in for an evening of Brazilian music with pianist Vitor Goncalves and the great Brazilian vocalist Maucha Adnet.

Doors @ 7:30 PM
Yotam Silberstein sets @
8 PM & 9:30 PM
Tony Hewitt "After-hours" @ 11 PM


To advance purchase a reserved seat click:
CLICK HERE TO RESERVE

Thursday - 9/29
Mike Longo & Paul West

Jazz legend Mike Longo returns to Mezzrow with his equally legendary bassist Paul West for an evening of duets.

Doors @ 7:30 PM
Mike Longo sets @ 8 PM & 9:30 PM
 Spike Wilner "After-hours" @ 11 PM

To advance purchase a reserved seat click:
CLICK HERE TO RESERVE

Friday, Saturday - 9/30-10/1
Jonny King with
Ed Howard & Victor Lewis


Pianist Jonny King was one of the original "young lions" and today still plays with a fiery grace and drive.  He'll be joined by his trio of Ed Howard (Friday) and Gerald Cannon (Saturday) on bass and Victor Lewis on drums.

To advance purchase a reserved seat click:

Sunday - 10/2
David Hazeltine with Paul Gill

Pianist David Hazeltine is the consumate New York professional.  With a driving swing and crystal touch.  He is joined by the rock-solid Paul Gill on bass.

Doors @ 7:30 PM
David Hazeltine sets @ 8 PM & 9:30 PM
Spike Wilner "after-hours" @ 11 PM

To advance purchase a reserved seat click:

CLICK HERE TO RESERVE
Mezzrow proudly endorses Steinway pianos

THIS WEEK AT SMALLS
(a selection of featured shows)

For our full schedule please go to www.smallslive.com

Monday - 9/26
The Carol Morgan Quartet

 Sets at 7:30 PM & 9 PM
     with Carol Morgan - Trumpet, Joel Frahm - Tenor Sax, Martin Wind - Bass, Matt Wilson - Drums 
Monday - 9/26
The Ari Hoenig Nonet
 Sets at 10:30 PM & 12 AM

     with Ari Hoenig - Drums, Noam Wiesenberg - Bass,  Eden Ladin - Piano, Eden Bareket - Baritone Sax, Jonathan Voltzok, Darren Barrett - Trumpet, Tim Gallagher - French Horn, Adam Larson - Tenor Sax, Will Vinson - Alto Sax
Tuesday - 9/27
The Spike Wilner Trio
 Sets at 7:30 PM & 9 PM

     with Spike Wilner - Piano, Tyler Michell - Bass, Anthony Pinciotti - Drums
Tuesday - 9/27
The Josh Evans Quartet
 Sets at 10:30 PM & 12 AM

     with Josh Evans - Trumpet, Joe Ford - Alto Sax, Rashaan Carter - Bass, Eric McPherson - Drums
Wednesday 9/28
Arcoiris Sandoval
Sonic Asylum Quintet

Sets at 7:30 PM & 9 PM

     with Arcoiris Sandoval - Piano, Jaleel Shaw - Alto Sax, Lucas Pino - Tenor Sax, Mimi Jones - Bass, Nathan Ellman-Bell - Drums
Wednesday - 9/28
The George DeLancey Quartet
Sets at 10:30 PM & 12 AM

    with George DeLancey - Bass, Stacy Dillard - Tenor Sax, Tadataka Unno - Piano, Curtis Nowosad - Drums
Thursday - 9/29
The Bob DeVos Quartet
Sets at 7:30 PM & 9 PM

    with Bob DeVos - Guitar, Ralph Bowen - Tenor Sax, Dan Kostelnik - Organ, Steve Johns - Drums
Thursday - 9/29
The Ned Goold Quartet
Sets at 10:30 PM & 12 AM
     with Ned Goold - Tenor Sax, Andrew Renfroe - Guitar, Reid Taylor - Bass, Charles Goold - Drums
Friday - 9/30
The Behn Gillece Quartet
Sets at 7:30 PM & 9 PM

$20 for this show
     with  Behn Gillece - Vibraphone, Nate Radley - Guitar, Paul Gill - Bass, Anthony Pinciotti - Drums
Friday & Saturday - 9/30-10/1
The Jean-Michel Pilc Quintet

Sets at 10:30 PM & 12 AM
$20 for this show
    with Jean-Michel Pilc - Piano, Joel Frahm - Tenor Sax, Melissa Aldana - Tenor Sax, Francois Moutin - Bass, Ari Hoenig - Drums
Saturday - 10/1
The Eddie Allen Quartet

Sets at 7:30 PM & 9 PM
$20 for this show
     with Eddie Allen - Trumpet, James Weidman - Piano, Corcoran Holt - Bass, Jerome Jennings - Drums
Sunday - 10/2
The Johnny O'Neal Trio

Sets at 7:30 PM & 9 PM
     with Johnny O'Neal - Piano, Luke Sellick - Bass, Charles Goold - Drums
Sunday - 9/30
The Charles Owens Quartet

Sets at 10:30 PM & 12 AM
     with Charles Owens - Tenor Sax, Jeremy Manasia - Piano, Alexander Claffy - Bass, Charles Ruggiero - Drums

SMALLS JAZZ CLUB REGULAR SHOWS

Monday - 9/26, 1 AM to close
After-hours with Jonathan Barber

 

Tuesday - 9/27, 1 AM to close 
After-hours with DeLancey/Nowosad Quartet


Wednesday - 9/28, 1 AM to close
After-hours Jam Session with
 Aaron Seeber

 

Thursday - 9/29, 1 AM to close 
After-hours Jam Session with Joel Ross

 

Friday - 9/30, 4 PM - 7 PM
Andrew Forman - Afternoon Jam Session

 

Friday - 9/30, 1 AM to close
After-Hours with Craig Wuepper

 

Saturday - 10/1, 4 PM to 7 PM
Jonathan Thomas - Afternoon Jam Session

 

Saturday - 10/1, 1 AM to close
After-hours with Philip Harper

 

Sunday - 10/2,  1 PM to 3 PM
Vocal Workshop with Marion Cowings

 

Sunday - 10/2,  4:30 PM to 7 PM
Ai Murakami Trio Feat. Sacha Perry


Sunday - 9/18,  1 AM to close
After-hours with Hillel Salem

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