Copy
View this email in your browser
Share Share
Tweet Tweet
Forward Forward
Share Share
Read Later Read Later

In this issue:

  • TRA L'ARTE - VIDEO INTERVIEW WITH CRISTINA RESTI - ARTE GENERALI
  • YOUNG IS BEAUTIFUL IN PAESTUM
  • BOTTICELLI: DID SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE MAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE?
  • PRECIOUS COLOURS OF THE EMPIRE
  • FRANS FLORIS HIDDEN CAT
  • THE THIRD WAY FOR MUSEUMS SURVIVAL
  • LEONARDO AND THE MAGIC WORD OF AUCTIONS
  • MOSAICS: THERE IS NO PLACE LIKE HOME
  • THE SECRETS OF THE "VIRGIN BY MURILLO
  • CARAVAGGIO SUPERSTAR AT THE UFFIZI
  • IT WAS A DARK AND STORMY NIGHT IN FLORENCE 
  • THE INDIGNATION OF THE SPEDALINGO: ROSSO AT THE UFFIZI
  • AN XRAYS CAN CHANGE YOUR LIFE
TRA L'ARTE- INTERVIEWS TO THE ART WORLD

Cristina Resti Art historian and Art Expert & Art Network Manager for Arte Generali

She tells us how no one really owns a work of art, how we are only its custodians and how our task is to prolong its life.

After all, an insurance policy is the synthesis of the history of a work of art, and for this reason working in the insurance field is absolutely natural for an art historian.

But what happens when a wrecking ball accidentally hits a De Chirico?


  CLICK HERE FOR THE VIDEO

Young is beautiful (and efficient)

Spurious controversy over the new director of Pompeii

Gabriel Zuchtriegel is the new director of the Pompeii Archaeological Park. Not even 48 hours have passed since his appointment that the controversy is pressing. He is judged to be "too young" with "little experience". Not our experience! During the years, we appreciated his passion and professionalism and his academic preparation.
(read more)



(Emanuela Massa)

Did scientific evidence make all the difference?

There has been a 9x increase of its value

Portrait of a Young Man Holding a Roundel, by Sandro Botticelli, was offered at auction at Christie’s London in December 1982 with the title Portrait of Giovanni de Pierfrancesco de’ Medici, attributed to Botticini, and it was sold to the New York real estate magnate Sheldon Solow for a then-record £810,0000 ($1.1 million in today’s currency).

(read  more)


(Anna Pelagotti)

Precious colours of the empire

A shade of blue of exclusive use 

The recent discovery of a very rare Chinese porcelain reminds us of another remarkable discovery for oriental art and technique in which we were involved. A few days ago, thanks to a search started in 2014, a RU bowl belonging to the Song dynasty was identified within the collection of the Dresden museum. 

(read more)



(Emanuela Massa)

I saw a cat

Cats… they hide everywhere and pop up when you do not expect them! For example, in this painting by Frans Floris in which a cat is visible only thanks to Reflectography, as it is not present in the final version.
But surprises are not over! Did you know that a painting very similar to this one  (now at the Palatine Gallery in Florence), can be seen in the  “Cabinet d’amateur”, which represents the workshop of Jan Suellincks and is attributed to J. Franken II currently in Bruxelles?

(read more)

 
(Emanuela Massa)

The Third Way for Museum survival


How to double your income during a pandemic

This past year was a fatal year. A year of closures, of crises and layoffs; in short, a disaster for art, increasingly overwhelmed by events. The problem is that there is still no end in sight to it.
But someone has found a new and innovative way to double the income and rewrite the role of museums.

(read more)


(Chiara Martine Menchetti)

Leonardo and the magic world of auctions

The renewed controversy over the attribution of Leonardo’s Salvator Mundi calls for a reflection on how it has become all-important not so much to choose which painting to buy, but which attribution. We have seen several times how the purchase of some artworks was subsequently refused, disputing the given attribution. 
(read more)

(Emanuela Massa)

There is no place like home

Let’s face it, about a year after the start of the pandemic, we can’t wait to go back to travel. We  cook recipes from faraway latitudes, write a nostalgic emails to our old Erasmus friends, and sadly archive airline newsletters. But. But when something beautiful happens in Florence, we get all emotional

(read more)


(Federica Fani)

The secrets of the Virgin by Murillo

New discoveries thanks to scientific investigations

The "Madonna and child" by Bartolomè Esteban Murillo, dated around 1675, counted Gustave Flaubert among its many admirers.  He, after having made a trip to Rome in 1851, spoke of it in these terms: “I am in love with the Virgin by Murillo of the Gallery Corsini. Her head haunts me and her eyes continue to pass in front of me like two dancing lanterns”. ‘The French writer had grasped the great intensity of an apparently simple but highly expressive composition.
(read more)


(Federica Fani)

A cup of poison for Florence

On 3 February 1865, Florence became the capital of Italy, to remain so until 1871. The news, which should have made Florentines proud, on the contrary, did not excite them at all. Bettino Ricasoli, who was also Prime Minister, in anticipation of major problems and an equally large waste of money, called the move a “cup of poison" for the city
(read more)


(Anna Pelagotti)

It was a dark and stormy night

The night between 26 and 27 January 1601 must  have been not so peaceful. A very violent lightning struck Verrocchio’s golden ball that overlooks the dome of the Florence Cathedral, threw it off and dropped it where a plaque still remembers the point of impact. The impression was enormous.

(read more)


(Anna Pelagotti)

Caravaggio, a star at the Uffizi in Florence

We were extremely honored to hear Dr. Maria Matilde Simari talk about the discovery by Art-Test on Caravaggio’s Bacchus during the popular Facebook online events produced by the Uffizi Galleries. A small but extraordinary self-portrait that literally came to light

(read more)

 
(Anna Pelagotti)

The indignation of the Spedalingo

It was January 30, 1518, when Leonardo Buonafede, “spedalingo” or rector of the hospital of Santa Maria Nuova in Florence, commissioned Giovan Battista di Jacopo di Gasparre, a promising artist of humble origins, without a real surname and called Rosso Fiorentino a Sacred Conversation. Delivery was scheduled for June of the same year and the agreed amount was 25 wide gold florins

(read more)


(Chiara Martine Menchetti)

An Xrays can change your life!

Much of what we know about Van Gogh comes from his correspondence, especially with his brother Theo, collected and published posthumously by Johanna van Gogh-Bonger, his brother’s widow. In one of the letters, dated January 22, 1886, composed while studying in Antwerp at the Academy, Vincent also writes “… this week I painted a big thing with two nude torsos … two wrestlers”, an exercise probably.

(read more)

 
(Anna Pelagotti)
Interested in knowing more about what we do?
Contact us using one of the Social Media here below!


La nostra newsletter è anche disponibile in Italiano
Twitter
Facebook
Website
Email
Instagram
Pinterest
YouTube
LinkedIn
Copyright © *2020* *Art-Test.s.a.s.*, All rights reserved.


Our mailing address is:
info@art-test.com
Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

 






This email was sent to <<Email Address>>
why did I get this?    unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences
Art-Test Sas · Via Santo Spirito 11 · Florence, Italy 50125 · Italy

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp