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This week we will be covering developments in Amazon's entrance into healthcare, new cancer prevention research, and a new cervical cancer trend
Amazon in Running to Purchase Health Care Company
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Amazon has recently become one of the bidders who wants to purchase Signify Health, a popular home health service provider. Signify is on an auction of sorts, with multiple bidders including pharmacies like CVS Health and now Amazon as well. Andy Jassy, who was named CEO in July of 2021, specifically has discussed his interest in Amazon entering the healthcare space. 

Signify Health is a national company that leverages data and analytics of patient demographics to cater to patient care and help with insurance coverage as well. People familiar with the matter said that Signify is said to be valued at nearly 8 billion dollars, which would make this one of Amazon’s largest healthcare related acquisitions to date. In July, Amazon bought 1Life Healthcare for 3.9 billion dollars. 1Life is a parent company to a chain of primary care clinics based on the West coast, and a company CVS Health was also looking to acquire before Amazon did. 

New Preventable Risk Factors of Cancer
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A new research study has shown that in 2019, 44.4% of cancer deaths could be attributed to preventable risk factors. This research comes from one of the largest organized studies with the intention of finding out true risk factors of cancer in humans. The three factors the paper discusses in this study are smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, and a high body mass index. The project has analyzed data across the entire world between cancer related deaths and common features among those who have been diagnosed with cancer. The data also showed that cancer rates have risen 20.4% from 2010 to 2019.

Dr.William Dalhut, Chief Scientific Officer of the American Cancer Society and an unattached doctor to the study above, also wrote how the increasing relationship between obesity and cancer rates is something that “demands our [doctors] attention.” He discusses how making lifestyle changes can be one of the most important things someone can do to help prevent cancer. He discusses how certain risk factors are related, such as alcohol being something that can contribute to the increase of body mass index, both potential risk factors of cancer.

BLUEPRINTS SPOTLIGHT
Celeste Kettaneh is a junior at the University of Michigan pursuing a degree in Community & Global Public Health. She is interested in health equity, social justice, and minority health. In the future, Celeste hopes to be a physician, providing culturally-tailored care to communities of color and dismantling the racist and inequitable structures in medicine.
New Cervical Cancer Research
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Studies have recently shown that there has been an increase in late stage cervical cancer. Scientists are hypothesizing the reason for the uptick in this category is due to younger women not getting screened as often for the cancer. Although the overall rate of cervical cancer across the country is declining, the number of women suffering from advanced stages of cervical cancer has been increasing. A study published last year also showed a 3.39% increase in advanced cases across women from ages 30-34.

The CDC recommends women start getting Pap tests at age 21 and get tested every three years. Cervical cancer detected at an earlier stage can be removed and is known to have a survival rate of 90% compared to a 17% survival rate for late stage cervical cancer cases. The CDC is also encouraging increased HPV testing, as HPV is linked to 90% of cervical cancers, and a high rate of linkage to many other cancers as well.

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