The Newsletter contains information on case studies and role plays to help you plan upcoming courses and professional development with actively engaging, participant-centered learning.

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#1 Role Play Gets an Update

Diego Primadonna, the top downloaded material from HLS Case Studies, has been updated to review the full Seven Elements of Negotiation from Fisher and Ury’s Getting to Yes.

In this negotiation simulation, an aging soccer star and a Brazilian soccer club broker a contract deal. During the negotiation, participants will practice probing for interests, creating value, defining the zone of possible agreement, and implementing distributional strategy. Read full article...

New Case Studies

"These simulations take the student far beyond the requirements of a typical law school assignment, which ends at the submission of a written work product. In actual legal professional settings, a lawyer will, after producing formal legal advice, often have to continue to engage in a sophisticated, responsive, assuring, and competent manner with a client. In certain respects, these skills may be what matter most to a client."

--Danae Peterson, HLS student, on new case suite
Somalia in Crisis: Famine, Counterterrorism, and Humanitarian Aid

Read full article.

Case Studies
Greatest Hits


Top Three New Cases of 2014:


Learn more about the case studies on our blog!
Meet Our Authors: Q&A Series

Nathan Cisneros

 
Sponsorship at Wilmer, Cutler, & Pickering (A) and (B)

How do you approach the case writing process?
NC: I’ve always thought that it is best to start with an interesting question or surprising event. If you start with a compelling question you usually discover a compelling answer, whatever it may be. Since case studies are richly detailed narratives of real-world events, we can’t choose our own ending. However, if we begin with a gripping question we invariably arrive at a captivating resolution. Needless to say, our primary objective is to create a useful tool for classroom discussion, not a page-turner, but they feed into one another. It is far easier to provide nuanced perspectives on a strategic challenge or professional dilemma in case studies built around a truly puzzling incident. Read full article...


Dr. Lisa Rohrer


Sponsorship at Wilmer, Cutler, & Pickering (A) and (B)

What inspired the case study?
LR: The topic of sponsorship is a great way to provide perspective on two pressing issues facing law firms today: the training of junior attorneys and diversity. While many law firms have had mentoring programs for some time, sponsorship is a much newer concept. A sponsor is someone who doesn’t necessarily provide emotional support to a younger colleague but actually will put their own reputation on the line by opening doors to opportunities that the younger attorney may not have otherwise had access to. Sponsorship is often used in the context of diversity programs (to help women and minority attorneys gain more visibility with clients and powerful partners) but it’s not strictly a diversity issue. Read full article...


Professor Robert Bordone

What challenges and opportunities did the case writing process present?
RB: Primarily, we needed to be able to educate our students about biotechnology. I’m not a food policy or science expert, nor was our target audience. We needed to write a case short enough to use in a basic negotiation class, but we needed to educate students enough to be versed for the negotiation. Another challenge – which made the case unique – was the balance between scorable and nonscorable components. You have to test it a lot, because within the scorable parts, you want people to pay attention to the points. When you include nonscorable elements, it’s like an exhaust pipe, a release from the pressure of negotiating for points-based agreements. Read full article...

For more information, or to discuss how to adapt our case studies for your academic or professional education needs, contact Lisa Brem, Case Studies Program Manager, at lbrem@law.harvard.edu.
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