In this Newsletter    
Editorial   Dear Readers, 

   Welcome to our August edition.  

Summer is still in full swing and I would rather be outside than stuck in the office!

I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for five wonderful years. I have had a lot of fun working on the newsletter and with all of you.

From now on, Erika will be taking care of the newsletter and keep you informed. I will be leaving QCM at the end of August to begin a new adventure with a different company.

So again, thank you all, and I wish you all the best!

A quick word from Erika:
I will be introducing myself slowly over the next coming months, and I would like to thank Tina for the help she has given me in learning the ropes around QCM!
 
This month, Georg Stöcker examines the topic of  holidays and Continuing Airworthiness Arrangements in the
main article.
 
Also included, are a couple of
short topics.
 
In the not-too-distant future, there are our courses to consider. Please have a look at the
open course status and our course updates for further information.
 
This month, we have a few 
job offers and you can, of course, continue to send us your job offers.
 
On behalf of QCM, I would like to wish the best of luck to the staff who are leaving us, and a bright future, too!
  



Tina Cameron
Q.C.M

 
Main Article
Newsflash

I. NPAs

II. SABRE Technology - A Revolutionary New Engine

III. NASA Transfers NextGen Software Tool to the FAA

IV. QCM Campus
Stage 2

 
Course Updates
I. Open Course Status Sep - Nov 2013

II. Open Course Status EASA Part-147 Type Trainings
 
Job Market
   







Questions Regarding a Continuing Airworthiness Arrangement

It's bar / beer time and, oh gosh! Once again, it's newsletter time!
My dear colleague has just reminded me by sending me a nice email asking for an article.

   

So, I am sitting here; in the next room, there is a little party going on. A tourist group is singing old traditional songs to the tunes of a guitar player. It looks like the old ladies and gentlemen are traveling back in history while listening thoughtfully to the lyrics and melodies.
 


 

 

Traveling: yes, that's what I will do soon. And that's why I am sitting here already, even though the month has a few days left: my holidays are coming! Another two days of "hard" work and then I have two weeks off. My family is looking forward to have me around. Maybe they will have a different opinion once I am at home for more than two consecutive days, but we'll see!
But we will not be staying at home the whole time. My family wanted to leave home for a couple of days, so we will pack our car and drive towards the south, extending our summer.
To arrive safely at the destination and finally back home, I have to ensure that the car is fit for the travel. Yes, that is my responsibility as being the car owner (although this is not entirely correct because it is my wife's car) and therefore, I have to ensure that all required maintenance is done and the car is roadworthy.


 


And with that, I am entering a subject I have just discussed with a valued reader of our newsletter today - not about cars, but rather with respect to aircraft: responsibility regarding continuing airworthiness and furthermore regarding the correctness and completeness of the maintenance programme and the adherence to said maintenance programme.
 

Talking about privately operated aircraft, we all know that the responsibility for the continuing airworthiness of the aircraft rests with the owner.

But what is the situation if an owner signs an agreement with a continuing airworthiness management organisation in accordance with Part-M Appendix I?
M.A.201(e) specifies:
In order to satisfy the responsibilities of paragraph (a),

  1. the owner of an aircraft may contract the tasks associated with continuing airworthiness to a continuing airworthiness management organisation approved in accordance with Section A, Subpart G of this Annex (Part M). In this case, the continuing airworthiness management organisation assumes responsibility for the proper accomplishment of these tasks. ...

With this paragraph, for me it is evident that the ultimate responsibility for the continuing airworthiness still stays with the owner of the aircraft.
The Part-M Subpart G Organisation (CAMO) is "only" responsible to perform all contracted continuing airworthiness tasks in a correct way ("... proper accomplishment of these tasks ...").

 


 

The discussion I had today was with respect to the specific situation when the owner signs a limited contract with a CAMO for the development of the maintenance programme only.
With respect to this specific situation M.A.201(e)(ii) specifies:

In order to satisfy the responsibilities of paragraph (a),
...
(ii)   An owner who decides to manage the continuing airworthiness of the aircraft under its own responsibility, without a contract in accordance with Appendix I, may nevertheless make a limited contract with a continuing airworthiness management organisation approved in accordance with Section A, Subpart G of this Annex (Part M), for the development of the maintenance programme and its approval in accordance with point M.A.302. In that case, the limited contract transfers the responsibility for the development and approval of the maintenance programme to the contracted continuing airworthiness management organisation.

And, furthermore, AMC M.A.201(e) specifies:
The limited contract for the development and approval of the aircraft maintenance programme should cover the responsibilities related to M.A.302(d) and (g). This contract may also entitle the M.A. Subpart G organisation to use the indirect approval procedure described in M.A.302(c).
Where are now the responsibilities? Who has to do what?

 


 

As it is stated in AMC M.A.201(e):
The limited contract ... should cover the responsibilities related to M.A.302(d) and (g). ...
But, what is required as per M.A.302(d) and M.A.302(g)?

M.A.302(d) specifies:
The aircraft maintenance programme must establish compliance with:
(i)      instructions issued by the competent authority;
(ii)     instructions for continuing airworthiness:
-     issued by the holders of the type certificate, restricted typecertificate, supplemental type-certificate, major repair design approval, ETSO authorisation or any other relevant approval issued under Regulation (EC) No 1702/2003 and its Annex (Part-21), and
-     included in the certification specifications referred to in point 21A.90B or 21A.431B of the Annex (Part-21) to Regulation (EC) No 1702/2003, if applicable;
(iii)   additional or alternative instructions proposed by the owner or the continuing airworthiness management organisation once approved in accordance with point M.A.302, except for intervals of safety related tasks referred in paragraph (e), which may be escalated, subject to sufficient reviews carried out in accordance with paragraph (g) and only when subject to direct approval in accordance with point M.A.302(b).
M.A.302(g) specifies:
The aircraft maintenance programme shall be subject to periodic reviews and amended accordingly when necessary. These reviews shall ensure that the programme continues to be valid in light of the operating experience and instructions from the competent authority whilst taking into account new and/or modified maintenance instructions promulgated by the type certificate and supplementary type certificate holders and any other organisation that publishes such data in accordance with Annex (Part-21) to Regulation (EC) No 1702/2003.

Based on all these requirements (M.A.201(e), M.A.302(d), M.A.302(g)), the contract signed between the two parties – the owner and the CAMO – must clearly define who is responsible for what.
Whilst talking about the maintenance programme, I have seen two different situations:

  1. The owner contracts the development of the maintenance programme to the CAMO as well as keeping this maintenance programme current.

In this situation, the CAMO is responsible in ensuring that the maintenance programme:

  1. is complying with all requirements from the authorities and the TC-/STC-holders,
  2. is approved by the authority and
  3. continuously complies with all these requirements which includes periodic reviews.
  4. The owner contracts only the development of the maintenance programme to the CAMO.

Using these points, the CAMO is clearly responsible for ensuring that the maintenance programme complies with all requirements from the authorities and the TC-/STC-holders.
The responsibility for approval of the maintenance programme and the continuous compliance with all the requirements stays with the owner.

 

In both situations, it remains the responsibility of the owner to ensure that all required maintenance is carried out by appropriately approved/authorised organisations or persons in accordance with the approved maintenance programme.
But who has to sign the declaration which states that the maintenance programme complies with all requirements initially and continuously?
For me, this is also evident.
In the first scenario, the declaration should be signed by the CAMO and in the second scenario, it should be signed by the owner.

I put it to you now, dear readers:
What is your opinion?
What is your experience?
How this subject is handled throughout Europe?
Is there a consistency or is it handled differently in the individual Member States?
I'm looking forward to receiving your feedback.
 
Just a further outlook regarding this subject.
It is very likely that you are aware that in 2012, EASA published the NPA 2012-17, which incorporates the following changes to these requirements:
"...
M.A.201 Responsibilities
(a)  The owner is responsible for the continuing airworthiness of an aircraft and shall ensure that no flight takes place unless:
1.   the aircraft is maintained in an airworthy condition, and;
2.   any operational and emergency equipment fitted is correctly installed and serviceable or clearly identified as unserviceable, and;
3.   the airworthiness certificate remains valid, and;
4.   the maintenance of the aircraft is performed in accordance with the approved maintenance programme as specified in M.A.302.
...
(e) In order to satisfy the responsibilities of paragraph (a),
(i)   The owner of an aircraft may contract the tasks associated with continuing airworthiness to a continuing airworthiness management organisation approved in accordance with Section A, Subpart G of this Annex (Part M). In this case, the continuing airworthiness management organisation assumes responsibility for the proper accomplishment of these tasks. The contract described in Appendix I shall be used in this case.
(ii) An owner who decides to manage the continuing airworthiness of the aircraft under its own responsibility, without a contract in accordance with Appendix I, may nevertheless make a limited contract with:
-     a continuing airworthiness management organisation approved in accordance with Section A, Subpart G of this Annex (Part-M), or
-     in the case of ELA2 aircraft not involved in commercial operations, a Part-145 or M.A. Subpart F maintenance organisation which is under the oversight of the State of Registry of the aircraft,
for the development of the maintenance programme and processing its approval in accordance with point M.A.302. In that case, the limited contract transfers the responsibility for the development and, except in the case where a declaration is issued by the owner in accordance with M.A.302(h), processing the approval of the maintenance programme to the contracted continuing airworthiness management organisation.
..."
 

With this, ladies and gentlemen, I am now ready for holidays.

 

    

 


 
 






Notice of Proposed Amendments (NPAs)
 

TITLE
 
DATE PUBLISHED
END OF COMMENT
NPA 2013-16
Lead Flight Test Engineer Licence
 
13/08/2013 13/11/2013
NPA 2013-15
Update of Part-MED (Annex IV to Commission Regulation (EU) No 1178/2011) and Update of Acceptable Means of Compliance and Guidance Material to Part-MED (ED Decision 2011/015/R)
 
26/07/2013 28/10/2013
NPA 2013-14
Safety Key Performance Indicators (SKPIs) (ATM performance IR)
 
25/07/2013 05/09/2013
NPA 2013-13 
SACA & SAFA

 
22/07/2013 11/10/2013
NPA 2013-12 
Amendment to Decision 2003/19/RM (AMC to Part-145) to adapt it to the process of granting Part-145 approvals to maintenance organisations located outside the territories of the Member States

 
11/07/2013 11/10/2013







SABRE Technology - A Revolutionary New Engine


The Aerospace Industry is an amazing place: in our world, we can make man-made machines fly, and we constantly strive to improve the performance of our machines. In a vicious circle, the lighter the aircraft is, the better it's performance will be, in terms of fuel consumption. But here's an idea: what if, for some our marvellous machines, we could use more air?

That's exa
ctly what Reaction Engines of the UK have conceptually developed. 20 years of research, and in late July, the concept behind the SABRE (Synergetic Air-Breathing Rocket Engine) has been developed, and approved. The UK Government has proposed to invest ?? 60 million in two stages over four years, to help fund the completion of the project to produce a full engine.

A prototype engine is expected by 2017, and flight tests should be being performed by 2020.


Details about the SABRE can be found at: 
http://www.reactionengines.co.uk/sabre.html

For more information, read the press release, which can be found at: http://www.reactionengines.co.uk/press_release/Press_Release_17July2013_SABRE.pdf







NASA Transfers NextGen Software Tool to the FAA

August 14– In the latest example of NASA and the FAA working together to enhance safety and efficiency in the nation’s airspace, NASA has handed off to the FAA a new, NextGen software tool that will improve the flow of aircraft from runways to cruising altitudes.

The tool, called Precision Departure Release Capability (PDRC), was developed by NASA and transferred to the FAA today so the FAA can further develop and implement PDRC. This marks the third time in the past two years the two agencies have collaborated on the development of new technologies to enable aircraft to fly more efficiently, easing congestion in the nation’s skies and reducing aviation’s impact on the environment.

PDRC was developed after an extensive analysis of aircraft operations showed that uncertainty in precise departure times due to factors such as bad weather and heavy traffic may result in missed opportunities for those flights to efficiently merge into the flow of high altitude traffic. PDRC’s surface model component accurately predicts both departure times and departure runways. This information is automatically sent to en route centers, where PDRC’s en route model component provides ascent trajectories from takeoff to the merge point in the high-altitude traffic stream.

PDRC tests conducted since 2011 demonstrate that the tool helps to fill slots in the high-altitude flow that would otherwise go empty due to timing issues. PDRC would complement the technologies and procedures already being used by the FAA to manage traffic flow and ease delays through each phase of flight.

In earlier technology transfers, the FAA accepted a technology in February 2012 that also improves the management of air traffic in congested skies. This technology, called Three-Dimensional Path Arrival Management (3D PAM), helps air traffic controllers deliver aircraft from cruising altitude to the runway more efficiently, reducing noise and fuel burn.

In July 2011, NASA transferred to the FAA significant work on flow-based trajectory management, which helps air traffic controllers coordinate the flight paths of aircraft ascending through congested airspace in order to improve traffic flow and increase capacity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

QCM Campus Stage 2
 

 

The beginning of August saw the topping-out ceremony for the erection of the roof. Topping-out ceremonies are common in Europe as a blessing of the roof to remain sturdy, water-proof and to protect the people within.  It was amazing watching the roof rafters be put together in a day, especially watching the ease and confidence with which the carpenters balance precariously on the ridge of the roof!

The roof has progressed to having been tiled, and, soon, the building should be watertight. The fixes inside can carry on in the colder months, and our newest addition to the QCM Campus will be rocketing forward, full steam ahead!



Since the July newsletter, there haven't been many opportunities for a barbecue, despite a number of sunny days. Many people have been taking advantage of the nice weather to go on holidays and it has been quite a while since we enjoyed the hustle and bustle of a full office! We shall, however, continue to make use of the sunshine while it lasts. Our resident Aussie would like to point out that getting a daily dose of Vitamin D is good for our health, and, when at the beach (or lake, depending on where you are), remember to "Slip on a shirt, Slop on some sunscreen, and Slap on a hat!"






 


 

 




Please find below our open courses with seats available.

If you are interested in participating in these courses, or any other training, please do not hesitate to contact us.
  I. Open Course Status September 2013 - November 2013 
  Course title Date
Seats
available
Instructor
  EASA-OPS / EASA-FCL (Airplanes) 02. - 04.09.2013 open Claudio Pacozzi
  EASA Part-M Subpart G 10. - 11.09.2013 open Paul Baumann
  Airworthiness Review for ARC Signatories 12.09.2013 open Paul Baumann
  EASA Part-145 23. - 24.09.2013 open Georg Stöcker
  Human Factors Initial 16. - 17.09.2013 open Dave Paterson
  OTAR 39 01. - 02.10.2013 open Paul Baumann
  EASA Part-21 DOA Basic 08. - 09.10.2013 open Christian Schusser
  EASA Part-21 POA Differential 10.10.2013 open Christian Schusser
  EASA Part-66 / Part 147 14. - 15.10.2013 open TBD
  Safety & Quality Management Systems in Aviation 28. - 31.10.2013 open Markus Freidli
  NiCad Batteries 29. - 30.10.2013 2 Toni Bürgli
  SAFA Awareness 04.11.2013 open TBD
 If not stated otherwise, courses take place in our facilities in Belp/Berne.
Please click on the Course title for detailed information



 
II. Open Course Status EASA Part-147 Type Trainings
  Course title Date
Seats
available
Instructor
  Learjet 35/36 B1/T1 28.10. - 15.11.2013 open TBD
  Cessna 560XL B1 04. - 20.11.2013 open TBD
 If not stated otherwise, courses take place in our facilities in Belp/Berne.
Please click on the Course title for detailed information




 

  


Take advantage of our Newsletter platform if you wish to publish a job advertisement or if you are looking for a new challenge in the aviation industry.

Important:
Please note that details of job advertisements or searches for the next edition must reach our office (info@qcm.ch) by the 22nd of each month.

Without further notice, your advert will be published only once







Mechanic (m/f)
Postholder CAMO (m/f)


Fuchs Helicopter AG, one of the biggest MD helicopter operators
in Europe, is looking for dynamic, experienced and result-oriented
candidates. If you are looking for new job opportunities have a look
at our open positions.
 
We are searching for the following open positions:
 
Mechanic (m/f)
 
Requirements:

 
  • Part 66 Licence
  • Type rated for MD helicopters
Postholder CAMO (m/f)
 
Requirements:

  • Experience of three years in a CAMO Organization
  • Part 66 Licence on helicopter type twin and single engine
  • Experience in a leading function will be an advantage
 
Please send your written application to:
 
Fuchs Helikopter
Friesischwand 1
8834 Schindellegi
Switzerland



Q.C.M. quality control management AG Training Part-147
For our EASA Part-147 approved training organization we are looking for
Freelance Instructors for:

  • Dassault Falcon 900 series
  • Pilatus PC-12NG

You are someone who wants to influence your own development. This responsible role facilitates the necessity of developing and executing Aircraft Type Training for the following Aircraft Types:

  • Falcon 900
  • PC-12NG

Your profile:

  • Holder of an EASA Part-66 License in the category for which the training will be given (B1, B2, and/or C)
  • Knowledge proof of the relevant type of aircraft for which training will be given, gained through a formalised training course according EASA Part-66 Appendix III Level-3.

Please send your CV and relevant documents to Markus Enck (enck@qcm.ch)
Tel. +41 31 960 40 60 

 



 
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