Your Excellency, Dear Sir / Madam,

In my last e-mail, I shared with you the extensive Latin American media coverage of the Post-2015 Consensus Expert Panel’s findings - showing that by prioritizing 19 development targets, four times as much good will be achieved as if we tried to do everything. This week, I am sharing some of the coverage from Africa.

  • During May, I spent time in KenyaNigeria, and South Africa, hosting country-specific seminars, meeting with participants in the Post-2015 Youth Forums, and raising awareness of my new book, the The Nobel Laureates' Guide to the Smartest Targets for the World.
     
  • A report on KBR in Kenya highlighted the progress in tackling tuberculosis over the past 15 years, but also how much more work is needed

    “Nearly 2 Kenyans die each hour from Tuberculosis related complications and another 19 thousand succumb to the disease annually...” - from the KBR report by Marie Yambo
     
  • An article in the Daily Independent in Nigeria showed that expanding pre-school education could give a return of $65 for each $1 spent, benefitting the poorest children in the Northern States.
     
  • The Addis Fortune in Ethiopia, The East AfricanThe Standard in Zambia, and The Daily News in Egypt have all published the op-ed I co-wrote with Professor Nancy Stokey and Nobel Laureates Finn Kydland and Tom Schelling, reporting on the Expert Panel’s findings.
  • Our Global Youth Forums have given more than one thousand young people across Africa the opportunity to say which development targets they would prioritize, and so news agencies have recently published the results of Youth Forums held in GhanaKenyaNigeria, and Rwanda.
  • The attention afforded by this coverage is important, as it focuses minds on the need to prioritize the targets in the lead-up to the September Post-2015 negotiations at the UN. Over 18 months, Copenhagen Consensus Center has published 100+ peer-reviewed analyses from 82 of the world’s top economists and 44 sector experts, including many UN agencies and NGOs.I was interviewed by The Star of Kenya, and discussed the importance of prioritizing smart targets to do the most good.

I hope that you will find the time to consider these reports and present them to your government: by reducing the number of targets from 169 to 19 we would do four times as much good for the world over the next 15 years,

Kind regards,

 
Bjorn Lomborg
PhD and Adjunct Professor
President of Copenhagen Consensus Center

PS. The Post-2015 Consensus project brings together 60 teams of economists with NGOs, international agencies and businesses to identify the targets with the greatest benefit-to-cost ratio for the UN's post-2015 development goals. If you have questions about the project, reply to this email.
We have tweeted the benefit-cost evaluation of each current UN OWG post-2015 target. Follow us to see how all 169 current targets rated according to leading economists.
We have tweeted the benefit-cost evaluation of each current UN OWG post-2015 target. Follow us to see how all 169 current targets rated according to leading economists.


unsubscribe from this list