Your excellency, Dear Sir / Madam,

We have just published our fifth set of papers, this time focused on Data for Development.

As reported in The Guardian and on Reuters, the Copenhagen Consensus has published the first report to estimate the cost of the High Level Panel’s data revolution. The result: $1.5billion per target globally over fifteen years. For the Open Working Group’s final outcome document, this equates to $254 billion or almost two years of ODA funding. How much are we willing to spend on measuring the post-2015 development agenda?
 
One interesting point of comparison is looking at what industrialized countries spend on statistics. For example, both the Norwegian and British governments have official statistical services, which cost about 0.2% of GDP. Using this figure as a measure of willingness to pay would suggest that we should aim at four SDG targets, which could be properly monitored, rather than 169.

Data for Development Target Benefit for Every Dollar Spent
Enable the High Level Panel’s data revolution for the OWG’s 17 goals and 169 targets Likely to be < $1

You can read the all the reports at www.post2015consensus.com/datafordevelopment 

Morten Jerven, Associate Professor at Simon Fraser University writes the main report, peer-reviewed in perspective papers by Deborah Johnston of University of London, School of Oriental and African Studies, and Gabriel Demombynes, Senior Economist at the World Bank and Justin Sandefur, Research Fellow at the Center for Global Development. Additionally, NGOs and stakeholders such as UNDP and Overseas Development Institute present viewpoint papers concerning Jerven’s analysis. 


Best regards,
 
Bjorn Lomborg
PhD and Adjunct Professor
President of Copenhagen Consensus Center

PS. The Post-2015 Consensus project brings together more than 50 top economists, NGOs, international agencies and businesses to identify the targets with the greatest benefit-to-cost ratio for the next set of UN development goals. If you have questions about the project, send an email to Research Project Manager Brad Wong by replying to this email.
Each day on twitter we will be releasing the benefit-cost evaluation of a current UN OWG post-2015 target. Follow us to see how all 169 current targets rate according to leading economists.
Each day on twitter we will be releasing the benefit-cost evaluation of a current UN OWG post-2015 target. Follow us to see how all 169 current targets rate according to leading economists.
In a hurry?
Download the one page PDF summary here.


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