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REMINDER
STILL POINT GALLERY PRESENTS
AIMEE LEE
OPENING RECEPTION
FRIDAY, MARCH 3rd
(6:00 - 8:30 P.M.)

OPENS MARCH 3, CLOSES APRIL 22
"CLOTHED"

DRESSES AS WORKS OF ART
"FROM THE MUD"
HANJI, DYE & THREAD
12"X10"

Still Point Gallery is honored to host this special solo exhibit for Aimee Lee, one of Cleveland's leading artists. Having just returned from teaching in Vienna, Aimee is revered and exhibited in museums throughout the world.  She is a paper maker, writer, educator and this country's leading Hanji researcher and practitioner.  Her exhibit will feature paper dresses constructed from her own handmade hanji paper; a protracted and highly labor intensive creative process.

ARTIST PRESENTATION AND DEMONSTRATION
TWO SESSIONS  6:30 & 7:30
The creation of art is an amalgam of many elements including the artist's expressive vision, skills and generally pain staking labor. Ultimately, however, it is a process that includes the integration of the artist's experience.  And nothing can be much more process dependent and labor intensive than the art of making paper.  Aimee Lee's art culminates in a remarkable collection of clothing or expressive objects represented in this exhibit.  At our request she will generously share both her vision and process through two informal presentations (6:30 & 7:30) during the opening reception Friday. This is a rare opportunity to hear an artist's description of "process", not of the construction only, but how her experiences have directed her work.

Each of these pieces of clothing has a story, in the mind of the artist as well as in the perception and connection of the viewer.  They are works by a world class artist that can be acquired and passed down through generations.  


“… it’s not the physical manifestation in the “expressive object … it’s the whole process or the development of an experience.  Through the expressive object, the artist and observer encounter each other.”  Art as Experience,  John Dewey 
A GLIMPSE INTO THE PROCESS OF PAPER MAKING
AIMEE LEE
Papermaking Preparation: Harvest and Process
  • Travel to site
  • Cut down responsibly (timing the right season in the life cycle of the plant so it will grow back the next year—for example, cutting milkweed down too early means that butterflies will have nothing to eat and no place for chrysalises)
  • Cut away unneeded parts of plant (small shoots, leaves, etc.)
  • For bast fiber, steam stems (milkweed) or shoots (paper mulberry tree) for hours to allow the outer bast to pull away from the inner woody core
  • Strip bast fiber from core
  • Cook plant material in a caustic solution (this can include baking soda, washing soda, soda ash, potash, or ash from wood burning) for several hours
  • Rinse cooked fiber thoroughly
  • Beat fiber (either by hand with wooden mallets, or with a mechanical beater)
 
Sheet Formation and Finishing
  • Mix up formation aid (a mucilage that helps to make fine, even paper) in advance
  • Set up vat and station to couch (lay down) papers
  • Make sheets of paper in a slurry of water and beaten pulp, with formation aid, using special tools (a mould and deckle, a sugeta, or a bal and bal teul)
  • Press stack of wet paper in a hydraulic press or screw press to remove excess water
  • Pull damp sheets apart and dry in a restraint dryer OR brush onto flat surfaces to dry overnight
  • Unload drybox or peel away dry sheets
  • Sort and store (good paper in Asia is often aged, at least a year, before use)
 
Natural dyes & Surface Design
  • Depending on the plant dye, collect or harvest plant material until there is enough for a dye bath (examples: onion skins from kitchen scraps, dahlia blossoms from gardening)
  • Cook plant material with water to extract dye
  • Brush dye onto dry paper
  • Add mordant (usually aluminum acetate) in wet form (some colors do not require a mordant to fix the color, such as persimmon juice or calligraphy ink)
  • Repeat dye onto paper to remove any excess mordant
  • Other dye processes include folding and clamping, brushing on unevenly, multiple coats, and layering for different effects
  • Joomchi is a Korean way to texture paper and make it more pliable and easier to drape and sew. It also can be used to fuse paper to other paper with no adhesive
  • Beeswax is applied to make paper more translucent
 
Patterns and Sewing
  • Garments are made from patterns, either from other designers, or made on the spot to match the paper qualities
  • Sewing is done by hand or machine, with ironing in between steps
EACH DRESS A COLLECTIBLE WORK OF ART

PLEASE JOIN US FRIDAY, MARCH 3rd, 6:00 - 8:30
TO CELEBRATE THE OPENING OF AIMEE LEE'S
SOLO EXHIBIT
"CLOTHED"

        Evening, Still Point Gallery

Opening Reception: "Clothed", Aimee Lee
Friday, March 3rd:  6:00 - 8:30

Regular Hours:
Tuesday -Saturday: 11:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.  
Sundays:  12:00 - 5:00 p.m.

(216) 721-4992
kate@stillpoint-gallery.com
www.stillpoint-gallery.com

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