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For immediate release:
Nov. 6, 2013
Contact: 

Homeland Security and Emergency Management Joint Information Media Line (512) 974-0699

Flood Damage Assessment Update
Corrected version.

New information has been released regarding the number of homes damaged or destroyed in southeast Austin due to the Oct. 31 flooding.
  • Public safety officials estimated that about 1,791 properties have been inspected in Austin and Travis County as of Wednesday, Nov. 6
  • A total of 659 homes are damaged, of which 259 have received major damage
  • A total of 15 homes have been deemed by inspectors as destroyed
  • Cleanup crews have removed about 1,300 tons of debris from the affected area, roughly the weight equivalent of more than 800 mid-size cars
  • A total of 43 people remain sheltered in the Flood Assistance Center, which will continue to be operated jointly by the Red Cross, Central Texas government agencies and others throughout the week
The City of Austin Emergency Operation Center remains open throughout the week to monitor the status of recovery conditions.

According to the U.S. Geological Survey:
  • Water levels at Onion Creek at US 183 reached its record height of 41 feet during the Oct. 31 storm, when the US 183 water gauge rose 11 feet in 15 minutes between 6:15 a.m. and 6:30 a.m.
  • Available records show that water levels never before exceeded 40 feet at this location and only exceeded 35 feet during three other years: 2001, 1921 and 1869
  • The Onion Creek’s highest flow rate* during Oct. 31 was 120,000 cubic feet per second, which is nearly double the average flow rate of Niagara Falls 
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Note to editors:
For all flood related inquiries please call the Emergency Operations Center Joint Information Center Media Line at 512-974-0699 . Please ask for the on-staff PIO at the Center.
 
For up-to-date information regarding the City’s flood response efforts, follow @austintexasgov and @traviscountytx, and utilize the #atxfloods hash-tag. 

*Flow rate is the volume of fluid which passes through a given surface per unit time.
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